tremble

[trem-buhl]
verb (used without object), trembled, trembling.
1.
to shake involuntarily with quick, short movements, as from fear, excitement, weakness, or cold; quake; quiver.
2.
to be troubled with fear or apprehension.
3.
(of things) to be affected with vibratory motion.
4.
to be tremulous, as light or sound: His voice trembled.
noun
5.
the act of trembling.
6.
a state or fit of trembling.
7.
trembles, (used with a singular verb)
a.
Pathology, milk sickness.
b.
Veterinary Pathology. a toxic condition of cattle and sheep caused by the eating of white snakeroot and characterized by muscular tremors.

Origin:
1275–1325; Middle English trem(b)len (v.) < Old French trembler < Vulgar Latin *tremulāre, derivative of Latin tremulus tremulous

tremblingly, adverb
untrembling, adjective
untremblingly, adverb


1. shudder. See shake. 3. oscillate.
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Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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World English Dictionary
tremble (ˈtrɛmbəl)
 
vb
1.  to vibrate with short slight movements; quiver
2.  to shake involuntarily, as with cold or fear; shiver
3.  to experience fear or anxiety
 
n
4.  the act or an instance of trembling
 
[C14: from Old French trembler, from Medieval Latin tremulāre, from Latin tremulus quivering, from tremere to quake]
 
'trembling
 
adj
 
'tremblingly
 
adv
 
'trembly
 
adj

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

tremble
c.1300, "shake from fear, cold, etc.," from O.Fr. trembler "tremble, fear" (11c.), from V.L. *tremulare (cf. It. tremolare, Sp. temblar), from L. tremulus "trembling, tremulous," from tremere "to tremble, shiver, quake," from PIE *trem- "to tremble" (cf. Gk. tremein "to shiver, tremble," Lith. trimu
"to chase away," O.C.S. treso "to shake," Goth. þramstei "grasshopper"). A native word for this was O.E. bifian. The noun is recorded from 1609.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Example sentences
While she posed, the petals in her bouquet trembled, as if getting married took
  all the nerve she could gather.
Spots of yellow-white sun trembled in brown tree-shadows on the lake-edge.
Her body shook as with a chill and her hands trembled so that she had
  difficulty getting into her nightdress.
In was inclosed to him, and as he opened the letter he trembled lest the dinner
  should be put off on which he was calculating.
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