trembles

tremble

[trem-buhl]
verb (used without object), trembled, trembling.
1.
to shake involuntarily with quick, short movements, as from fear, excitement, weakness, or cold; quake; quiver.
2.
to be troubled with fear or apprehension.
3.
(of things) to be affected with vibratory motion.
4.
to be tremulous, as light or sound: His voice trembled.
noun
5.
the act of trembling.
6.
a state or fit of trembling.
7.
trembles, (used with a singular verb)
a.
Pathology, milk sickness.
b.
Veterinary Pathology. a toxic condition of cattle and sheep caused by the eating of white snakeroot and characterized by muscular tremors.

Origin:
1275–1325; Middle English trem(b)len (v.) < Old French trembler < Vulgar Latin *tremulāre, derivative of Latin tremulus tremulous

tremblingly, adverb
untrembling, adjective
untremblingly, adverb


1. shudder. See shake. 3. oscillate.
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Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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World English Dictionary
tremble (ˈtrɛmbəl)
 
vb
1.  to vibrate with short slight movements; quiver
2.  to shake involuntarily, as with cold or fear; shiver
3.  to experience fear or anxiety
 
n
4.  the act or an instance of trembling
 
[C14: from Old French trembler, from Medieval Latin tremulāre, from Latin tremulus quivering, from tremere to quake]
 
'trembling
 
adj
 
'tremblingly
 
adv
 
'trembly
 
adj

trembles (ˈtrɛmbəlz)
 
n
1.  Also called: milk sickness a disease of cattle and sheep characterized by muscular incoordination and tremor, caused by ingestion of white snakeroot or rayless goldenrod
2.  a nontechnical name for Parkinson's disease

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

tremble
c.1300, "shake from fear, cold, etc.," from O.Fr. trembler "tremble, fear" (11c.), from V.L. *tremulare (cf. It. tremolare, Sp. temblar), from L. tremulus "trembling, tremulous," from tremere "to tremble, shiver, quake," from PIE *trem- "to tremble" (cf. Gk. tremein "to shiver, tremble," Lith. trimu
"to chase away," O.C.S. treso "to shake," Goth. þramstei "grasshopper"). A native word for this was O.E. bifian. The noun is recorded from 1609.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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