ubiquity

[yoo-bik-wi-tee]
noun
1.
the state or capacity of being everywhere, especially at the same time; omnipresence: the ubiquity of magical beliefs.
2.
(initial capital letter) Theology. the omnipresence of God or Christ.

Origin:
1570–80; < Neo-Latin ubiquitās, equivalent to Latin ubīqu(e) everywhere + -itās -ity

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World English Dictionary
ubiquitous (juːˈbɪkwɪtəs)
 
adj
having or seeming to have the ability to be everywhere at once; omnipresent
 
[C14: from Latin ubīque everywhere, from ubī where]
 
u'biquitously
 
adv
 
u'biquity
 
n
 
u'biquitousness
 
n

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

ubiquity
1579, from M.Fr. ubiquité (17c.), from L. ubique "everywhere," from ubi "where" (see ubi) + que "any, also, ever," a suffix that can give universal meaning to the word it is attached to. Originally a Lutheran theological position maintaining the omnipresence of Christ.
Ubiquitous in the sense of "turning up everywhere" is first recorded 1837, originally a jocular extension of the theological word.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Example sentences
The ubiquity of digital spectacles and curiosities today is one reason
  performance art has had its thunder stolen.
One reason is the pernicious ubiquity of credit cards, with punishing rates of
  interest.
It is easy to overlook the ubiquity of images in the modern world.
And the ubiquity of these creatures throughout the world's oceans makes them a
  silent sentinel of environmental change.
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