universe

[yoo-nuh-vurs]
noun
1.
the totality of known or supposed objects and phenomena throughout space; the cosmos; macrocosm.
2.
the whole world, especially with reference to humanity: a truth known throughout the universe.
3.
a world or sphere in which something exists or prevails: his private universe.
4.
Also called universe of discourse. Logic. the aggregate of all the objects, attributes, and relations assumed or implied in a given discussion.
5.
Also called universal set. Mathematics. the set of all elements under discussion for a given problem.
6.
Statistics. the entire population under study.

Origin:
1325–75; Middle English < Old French univers < Latin ūniversum, noun use of neuter of ūniversus entire, all, literally, turned into one, equivalent to ūni- uni- + versus (past participle of vertere to turn)

subuniverse, noun
superuniverse, noun
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Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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World English Dictionary
universe (ˈjuːnɪˌvɜːs)
 
n
1.  astronomy the aggregate of all existing matter, energy, and space
2.  human beings collectively
3.  a province or sphere of thought or activity
4.  statistics another word for population
 
[C16: from French univers, from Latin ūniversum the whole world, from ūniversus all together, from uni- + vertere to turn]

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

universe
1589, "the whole world, cosmos," from O.Fr. univers (12c.), from L. universum "the universe," noun use of neut. of adj. universus "all together," lit. "turned into one," from unus "one" (see one) + versus, pp. of vertere "to turn" (see versus).
Properly a loan-translation of Gk. to holon "the universe," noun use of neut. of adj. holos "whole" (see safe (adj.))
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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American Heritage
Science Dictionary
universe   (y'nə-vûrs')  Pronunciation Key 
The totality of matter, energy, and space, including the Solar System, the galaxies, and the contents of the space between the galaxies. current theories of cosmology suggest that the universe is constantly expanding.
The American Heritage® Science Dictionary
Copyright © 2002. Published by Houghton Mifflin. All rights reserved.
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Example sentences
After decades of effort, some scientists are beginning to despair of explaining
  the universe.
His suggestion that our universe may be a simulation run on the computer of an
  alien civilization is also old hat.
The jury is still out on whether current theories really are enough to explain
  the origins of the universe.
The universe is four-dimensional-three for space, one for time.
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