VOX

[voks]
noun
a device in certain types of telecommunications equipment, as telephone answering machines, that converts an incoming voice or sound signal into an electrical signal that turns on a transmitter or recorder that continues to operate as long as the incoming signal is maintained.

Origin:
acronym from voice-operated keying, altered to conform to Latin vōx voice

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vox et praeterea nihil

[wohks et prahy-te-re-ah ni-hil; English voks et pri-teer-ee-uh nahy-hil]
Latin.
a voice and nothing more.

vox populi, vox Dei

[wohks poh-poo-lee wohks de-ee; English voks pop-yuh-lahy voks dee-ahy, dey-ee]
Latin.
the voice of the people (is) the voice of God.
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Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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World English Dictionary
vox (vɒks)
 
n , pl voces
a voice or sound
 
[Latin: voice]

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

vox
1550, from L., lit. "voice" (see voice). Especially in vox populi (1550) "the voice of the people" (the full maxim is Vox populi vox Dei "the voice of the people is the voice of God").
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Example sentences for VOX
For the first few rehearsals he used vox and fender amplifiers.
As such, broadcast journalists almost always refer to them as the abbreviated vox pop.
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