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wise1

[wahyz] /waɪz/
adjective, wiser, wisest.
1.
having the power of discerning and judging properly as to what is true or right; possessing discernment, judgment, or discretion.
2.
characterized by or showing such power; judicious or prudent:
a wise decision.
3.
possessed of or characterized by scholarly knowledge or learning; learned; erudite:
wise in the law.
4.
having knowledge or information as to facts, circumstances, etc.:
We are wiser for their explanations.
5.
Slang. informed; in the know:
You're wise, so why not give us the low-down?
6.
Archaic. having knowledge of magic or witchcraft.
verb (used with object), wised, wising.
7.
Slang. to make wise or aware:
I'll wise you, kid.
Verb phrases
8.
wise up, Slang. to make or become aware of a secret or generally unknown fact, situation, attitude, etc.:
They wised him up on how to please the boss. She never wised up to the fact that the joke was on her.
Idioms
9.
be / get wise to, Slang. to be or become cognizant of or no longer deceived by; catch on:
to get wise to a fraud.
10.
get wise, Slang.
  1. to become informed.
  2. to be or become presumptuous or impertinent:
    Don't get wise with me, young man!
11.
put / set someone wise, Slang. to inform a person; let a person in on a secret or generally unknown fact:
Some of the others put him wise to what was going on.
Origin
900
before 900; Middle English (adj.), Old English wīs; cognate with Dutch wijs, German weise, Old Norse vīss, Gothic -weis; akin to wit1
Related forms
wisely, adverb
Synonyms
1, 2. sage, sensible, sagacious, intelligent.
Antonyms
1, 2. foolish.
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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Examples from the web for wiser
  • He was older, wiser, and filled with remarkable knowledge and understanding.
  • She left us immeasurably richer and wiser and appreciative of the wonderful diversity and richness of our world.
  • They all have past through many things in their lives, and that had made them wiser.
  • We know from experience that they will return home wiser and more mature.
  • Presumably the student who encounters such a curriculum may be none the wiser about what he missed.
  • In both cases, there are some decisions that are wiser and more appropriate than others.
  • But five years later, the scientist had changed jobs, and no one seemed the wiser.
  • In any case, count your blessings and plan to move on, wiser and better.
  • Then he would drive back home, his family none the wiser.
  • Investing in security at the event would have been a wiser decision.
British Dictionary definitions for wiser

wise1

/waɪz/
adjective
1.
possessing, showing, or prompted by wisdom or discernment
2.
prudent; sensible
3.
shrewd; crafty: a wise plan
4.
well-informed; erudite
5.
aware, informed, or knowing (esp in the phrase none the wiser)
6.
(slang) (postpositive) often foll by to. in the know, esp possessing inside information (about)
7.
(archaic) possessing powers of magic
8.
(slang, mainly US & Canadian) cocksure or insolent
9.
(often foll by to) (informal) be wise, get wise, to be or become aware or informed (of something) or to face up (to facts)
10.
(often foll by to) (slang) put wise, to inform or warn (of)
verb
11.
See wise up
Derived Forms
wisely, adverb
wiseness, noun
Word Origin
Old English wīs; related to Old Norse vīss, Gothic weis, German weise

wise2

/waɪz/
noun
1.
(archaic) way, manner, fashion, or respect (esp in the phrases any wise, in no wise)
Word Origin
Old English wīse manner; related to Old Saxon wīsa, German Weise, Old Norse vīsa verse, Latin vīsus face
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for wiser

wise

adj.

Old English wis, from Proto-Germanic *wisaz (cf. Old Saxon, Old Frisian wis, Old Norse viss, Dutch wijs, German weise "wise"), from past participle adjective *wittos of PIE root *weid- "to see," hence "to know" (see vision). Slang meaning "aware, cunning" first attested 1896. Related to the source of Old English witan "to know, wit."

A wise man has no extensive knowledge; He who has extensive knowledge is not a wise man. [Lao-tzu, "Tao te Ching," c.550 B.C.E.]
Wise guy is attested from 1896, American English. Wisenheimer, with mock German or Yiddish surname suffix, first recorded 1904.

n.

"way of proceeding, manner," Old English wise, ultimately from the same source as wise (adj.). Cf. Old Saxon wisa, Old Frisian wis, Danish vis, Middle Dutch wise, Dutch wijs, Old High German wisa, German Weise "way, manner." Most common in English now as a suffix (e.g. likewise). For sense evolution from "to see" to "way of proceeding," cf. cognate Greek eidos "form, shape, kind," also "course of action." Ground sense is "to see/know the way."

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Slang definitions & phrases for wiser

wise

adjective

Aware; cunningly knowing; hep: Get wise, son!/ He's close-mouthed and wise, stir-wise (1896+)

Related Terms

get wise, put someone wise, street-smart


The Dictionary of American Slang, Fourth Edition by Barbara Ann Kipfer, PhD. and Robert L. Chapman, Ph.D.
Copyright (C) 2007 by HarperCollins Publishers.
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Idioms and Phrases with wiser
The American Heritage® Idioms Dictionary
Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company.
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