wriggle

[rig-uhl]
verb (used without object), wriggled, wriggling.
1.
to twist to and fro; writhe; squirm.
2.
to move along by twisting and turning the body, as a worm or snake.
3.
to make one's way by shifts or expedients (often followed by out ): to wriggle out of a difficulty.
verb (used with object), wriggled, wriggling.
4.
to cause to wriggle: to wriggle one's hips.
5.
to bring, get, make, etc., by wriggling: to wriggle one's way through a narrow opening.
noun
6.
act of wriggling; a wriggling movement.

Origin:
1485–95; < Middle Low German wriggelen (cognate with Dutch wriggelen), frequentative of *wriggen to twist, turn, akin to Old English wrīgian to twist; see wry

wrigglingly, adverb
outwriggle, verb (used with object), outwriggled, outwriggling.
unwriggled, adjective
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Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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World English Dictionary
wriggle (ˈrɪɡəl)
 
vb
1.  to make or cause to make twisting movements
2.  (intr) to progress by twisting and turning
3.  (intr; foll by into or out of) to manoeuvre oneself by clever or devious means: wriggle out of an embarrassing situation
 
n
4.  a wriggling movement or action
5.  a sinuous marking or course
 
[C15: from Middle Low German; compare Dutch wriggelen]
 
'wriggler
 
n
 
'wriggly
 
adj

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

wriggle
1495, from M.L.G. wrigglen "to wriggle," from P.Gmc. *wrig-, *wreik- "to turn" (see wry). Related to O.E. wrigian "to turn, incline, go forward."
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Example sentences
They wriggle and wriggle and twist and turn until you wonder why they don't
  fall apart.
Cavers wriggle through unexplored, underground mazes.
Although a bony fish, it lacks a swim bladder and thus has to wriggle to move
  forward at the same depth.
They wriggle around, they latch on to surfaces, they drill their way through.
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