Xerox

Xerox

[zeer-oks]
1.
Trademark. a brand name for a copying machine for reproducing printed, written, or pictorial matter by xerography.
noun
2.
(sometimes lowercase) a copy made on a xerographic copying machine.
verb (used with object), verb (used without object)
3.
(sometimes lowercase) to print or reproduce by xerography.
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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World English Dictionary
Xerox (ˈzɪərɒks)
 
n
1.  trademark
 a.  a xerographic copying process
 b.  a machine employing this process
 c.  a copy produced by this process
 
vb
2.  to produce a copy of (a document, illustration, etc) by this process

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

Xerox
1952, trademark taken out by Haloid Co. of Rochester, N.Y., for a copying device, from earlier xerography "photographic reduplication without liquid developers" (1948), from Gk. xeros "dry" + -ography as in photography. The verb is first attested 1965, from the noun, despite strenuous objection from
the Xerox copyright department.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Slang Dictionary

XEROX

PARC /zee'roks park'/ n. The famed Palo Alto Research Center. For more than a decade, from the early 1970s into the mid-1980s, PARC yielded an astonishing volume of groundbreaking hardware and software innovations. The modern mice, windows, and icons style of software interface was invented there. So was the laser printer and the local-area network; and PARC's series of D machines anticipated the powerful personal computers of the 1980s by a decade. Sadly, the prophets at PARC were without honor in their own company, so much so that it became a standard joke to describe PARC as a place that specialized in developing brilliant ideas for everyone else.

The stunning shortsightedness and obtusity of XEROX's top-level suits has been well anatomized in "Fumbling The Future: How XEROX Invented, Then Ignored, the First Personal Computer" by Douglas K. Smith and Robert C. Alexander (William Morrow & Co., 1988, ISBN 0-688-09511-9).
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