abandon

1 [uh-ban-duhn]
verb (used with object)
1.
to leave completely and finally; forsake utterly; desert: to abandon one's farm; to abandon a child; to abandon a sinking ship.
2.
to give up; discontinue; withdraw from: to abandon a research project; to abandon hopes for a stage career.
3.
to give up the control of: to abandon a city to an enemy army.
4.
to yield (oneself) without restraint or moderation; give (oneself) over to natural impulses, usually without self-control: to abandon oneself to grief.
5.
Law. to cast away, leave, or desert, as property or a child.
6.
Insurance. to relinquish (insured property) to the underwriter in case of partial loss, thus enabling the insured to claim a total loss.
7.
Obsolete. to banish.

Origin:
1325–75; Middle English abando(u)nen < Middle French abandoner for Old French (mettre) a bandon (put) under (someone's) jurisdiction, equivalent to a at, to (< Latin ad; see ad-) + bandon < Germanic *band; see bond1

abandonable, adjective
abandoner, noun
abandonment, noun
nonabandonment, noun
unabandoning, adjective


1. See desert2. 2. Abandon, relinquish, renounce mean to give up all concern in something. Abandon means to give up or discontinue any further interest in something because of discouragement, weariness, distaste, or the like: to abandon one's efforts. Relinquish implies being or feeling compelled to give up something one would prefer to keep: to relinquish a long-cherished desire. Renounce implies making (and perhaps formally stating) a voluntary decision to give something up: to renounce worldly pleasures. 3. yield, surrender, resign, waive, abdicate.


1. keep. 2. continue; begin, start. 3. retain.
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Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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World English Dictionary
abandon (əˈbændən)
 
vb
1.  to forsake completely; desert; leave behind: to abandon a baby; drivers had to abandon their cars
2.  abandon ship the order given to the crew of a ship that is about to sink to take to the lifeboats
3.  to give up completely: to abandon a habit; to abandon hope
4.  to yield control of or concern in; relinquish: to abandon office
5.  to give up (something begun) before completion: to abandon a job; the game was abandoned
6.  to surrender (oneself) to emotion without restraint
7.  to give (insured property that has suffered partial loss or damage) to the insurers in order that a claim for a total loss may be made
 
n
8.  freedom from inhibitions, restraint, concern, or worry: she danced with abandon
 
[C14: abandounen (vb), from Old French, from a bandon under one's control, in one's power, from a at, to + bandon control, power]
 
a'bandonment
 
n

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

abandon
late 14c., "to subjugate, subdue," from O.Fr. abandoner "surrender," from à "at, to" + bandon "power, jurisdiction," in phrase mettre à bandon "to give up to a public ban," from L. bannum, "proclamation," from a Frankish word related to ban (v.). Etymologically,
the word carries a sense of "put someone under someone else's control." Meaning "to give up absolutely" is from late 14c. Related: Abandoned; abandoning. The noun sense of "letting loose, surrender to natural impulses" (1822) is from Fr. abandon.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Encyclopedia Britannica
Encyclopedia

abandonment

in Anglo-American property law, the relinquishment of possession of property with an intent to terminate all ownership interests in that property. Abandonment may occur by throwing away the property, by losing it and making no attempt to retrieve it, by vacating the property with no intention of returning to it, or by any other act manifesting a complete disclaimer of ownership in the property. The general effect of abandonment is to give full ownership of the property to the first taker.

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Encyclopedia Britannica, 2008. Encyclopedia Britannica Online.
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Example sentences
In this slow-moving river port, signs of abandonment are everywhere.
Whether this presages an abandonment of the referendum, an election or a new
  national government remained unclear.
Another step on the politicization of academia and abandonment of the
  scientific value of skepticism in the pursuit of knowledge.
The result was widespread failure and an abandonment of the genre in favour of
  reality television.
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