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aboard

[uh-bawrd, uh-bohrd] /əˈbɔrd, əˈboʊrd/
adverb
1.
on board; on, in, or into a ship, train, airplane, bus, etc.:
to step aboard.
2.
alongside; to the side.
3.
Baseball. on base:
a homer with two aboard.
4.
into a group as a new member:
The office manager welcomed him aboard.
preposition
5.
on board of; on, in, or into:
to come aboard a ship.
Idioms
6.
all aboard!, (as a warning to passengers entering or planning to enter a train, bus, boat, etc., just before starting) Everyone get on!
Origin
1350-1400
1350-1400; Middle English abord(e) (see a-1, board), perhaps conflated with Middle French a bord
Can be confused
aboard, abort, abroad.
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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Examples from the web for aboard
  • Hundreds of children were said to be aboard each vessel, singing as they set sail.
  • On the older buses, the engines rumble as the children climb aboard.
  • The air aboard commercial jetliners is considerably cleaner than almost everybody gives it credit for.
  • Characters in your films have excavated ancient sites and traveled the world aboard tramp steamers.
  • The sailors also left some more intimate items aboard the vessel.
  • The company even offered financing to bring the bands aboard.
  • Twin droplets of fuel burn brightly in an experiment aboard the space shuttle.
  • His world is a claustrophobic and lonely existence, until he makes a strange discovery aboard the ship.
  • See a feeding hummingbird and read about the tiny stowaways that climb aboard.
  • If you'd been aboard that plane, you certainly would have thought a streaming data link was worth trying.
British Dictionary definitions for aboard

aboard

/əˈbɔːd/
adverb, adjective, preposition (postpositive)
1.
on, in, onto, or into (a ship, train, aircraft, etc)
2.
(nautical) alongside (a vessel)
3.
all aboard!, a warning to passengers to board a vehicle, ship, etc
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for aboard
adv.

late 14c., probably in most cases from Old French à bord, from à "on" + bord "board," from Frankish *bord or a similar Germanic source (see board (n.2)); the "boarding" or sides of a vessel extended to the ship itself. The usual Middle English expression was within shippes borde. The call all aboard! as a warning to passengers is attested from 1838.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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