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acrimonious

[ak-ruh-moh-nee-uh s] /ˌæk rəˈmoʊ ni əs/
adjective
1.
caustic, stinging, or bitter in nature, speech, behavior, etc.:
an acrimonious answer; an acrimonious dispute.
Origin
1605-1615
1605-15; < Medieval Latin ācrimōniōsus. See acrimony, -ous
Related forms
acrimoniously, adverb
acrimoniousness, noun
unacrimonious, adjective
unacrimoniously, adverb
unacrimoniousness, noun
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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Examples for acrimonious
  • They should recognize that effective representation does not require antagonistic or acrimonious behavior.
  • Effective representation does not require antagonistic or acrimonious behavior.
  • The race became increasingly acrimonious as the primary election neared.
  • Most people will understand how acrimonious divorce leads to one-sided interpretations with exaggerations.
  • Another acrimonious row with traditionalists looks inevitable.
  • Wells, a freelance writer, explores the acrimonious debates among high-level hawks and doves in Washington.
  • They went so far as to repeal, after a spirited and acrimonious debate, the ordinance of secession.
  • There were acrimonious comments from both sides during the long negotiations.
  • They have begun divorce proceedings in an increasingly acrimonious split.
  • This launched a lively, and sometimes acrimonious, debate about the lives of dinosaurs.
British Dictionary definitions for acrimonious

acrimonious

/ˌækrɪˈməʊnɪəs/
adjective
1.
characterized by bitterness or sharpness of manner, speech, temper, etc
Derived Forms
acrimoniously, adverb
acrimoniousness, noun
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
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Word Origin and History for acrimonious
adj.

1610s, "acrid," from French acrimonieux, from Medieval Latin acrimoniosus, from Latin acrimonia (see acrimony). Of dispositions, debates, etc., from 1775. Related: Acrimoniously; acrimoniousness.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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