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[uh-jurn-muh nt] /əˈdʒɜrn mənt/
the act of adjourning or the state or period of being adjourned.
Origin of adjournment
1635-45; < Anglo-French adjournement, Middle French. See adjourn, -ment
Related forms
nonadjournment, noun
preadjournment, noun
proadjournment, adjective
readjournment, noun Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2015.
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Examples from the Web for adjournment
Contemporary Examples
Historical Examples
  • The committee sat for a short time to draw up rules of procedure and arrange an adjournment.

    Boycotted Talbot Baines Reed
  • It was after the first adjournment, and he came up with me in the street.

    Lord Jim Joseph Conrad
  • Three days after the adjournment of Nevins' court Camp Cooke had dropped back to the weary monotone of its everyday life.

    A Wounded Name Charles King
  • On any point that arose they wanted instructions from their government and pressed for an adjournment.

    Bulgaria Frank Fox
  • The Assizes were held accordingly on that date by adjournment from Thetford.

    Norfolk Annals Charles Mackie
  • When I left my substitute was just getting up to ask for the adjournment.

  • About one o'clock, the adjournment took place, and we returned, fatigued and disappointed.

    The Attache Thomas Chandler Haliburton
  • They were going out when Monsieur Vagret asked for an adjournment.

  • It was the day before adjournment and they expected to return the next morning.

Word Origin and History for adjournment

mid-15c., from Old French ajornement "daybreak, dawn; summons (to appear in court)," from ajorner (see adjourn).

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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