adjudication

[uh-joo-di-key-shuhn]
noun
1.
an act of adjudicating.
2.
Law.
a.
the act of a court in making an order, judgment, or decree.
b.
a judicial decision or sentence.
c.
a court decree in bankruptcy.

Origin:
1685–95; < Late Latin adjūdicātiōn- (stem of adjūdicātiō). See adjudicate, -ion

nonadjudication, noun
readjudication, noun
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
Cite This Source Link To adjudication
Collins
World English Dictionary
adjudicate (əˈdʒuːdɪˌkeɪt)
 
vb (when intr, usually foll by upon)
1.  to give a decision (on), esp a formal or binding one
2.  (intr) to act as an adjudicator
3.  (tr) chess to determine the likely result of (a game) by counting relative value of pieces, positional strength, etc
4.  (intr) to serve as a judge or arbiter, as in a competition
 
[C18: from Latin adjūdicāre to award something to someone, from ad- to + jūdicāre to act as a judge, from jūdex judge]
 
adjudi'cation
 
n
 
adjudicative
 
adj

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009
Cite This Source
Etymonline
Word Origin & History

adjudication
1690s, from L. adjudicationem, noun of action from adjudicatus, pp. of adjudicare (see adjudge).
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
Cite This Source
Example sentences
Real-time claims adjudication is a big component of his proposals.
First, the production and adjudication of poetry has become a profession rather
  than a calling.
The peaceful adjudication of property claims seems far away.
After everything else is completed, the final stage of the process is
  adjudication.
Copyright © 2014 Dictionary.com, LLC. All rights reserved.
  • Please Login or Sign Up to use the Recent Searches feature