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admire

[ad-mahyuh r] /ædˈmaɪər/
verb (used with object), admired, admiring.
1.
to regard with wonder, pleasure, or approval.
2.
to regard with wonder or surprise (usually used ironically or sarcastically):
I admire your audacity.
verb (used without object), admired, admiring.
3.
to feel or express admiration.
4.
Dialect. to take pleasure; like or desire:
I would admire to go.
Idioms
5.
be admiring of, Chiefly South Midland and Southern U.S. to admire:
He's admiring of his brother's farm.
Origin
1580-1590
1580-90; < Latin admīrārī, equivalent to ad- ad- + mīrārī (in Medieval Latin mīrāre) to wonder at, admire
Related forms
admirer, noun
preadmire, verb (used with object), preadmired, preadmiring.
preadmirer, noun
quasi-admire, verb, quasi-admired, quasi-admiring.
unadmired, adjective
Synonyms
1. esteem, revere, venerate.
Antonyms
1. despise.
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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Examples from the web for admired
  • Behaviour that's admired is the path to power among people everywhere.
  • She returned from a trip there with a shearling coat that her friends admired.
  • Loved and admired for her gentle disposition and good heart.
  • Your drive, determination, charm and charisma on and off the tennis court was admired by all.
  • To please will always be the wish of benevolence, to be admired the constant aim of ambition.
  • The king admired her gravity and wisdom in so tender an age, and would not suffer her to be any more disturbed on that account.
  • The austerities which he practised are rather to be admired than imitated.
  • It needs great virtues to be known and admired, or perhaps great vices.
  • His work was well known to, and much admired by, his poetical contemporaries.
  • He justified himself against the calumniators, but in such a manner that the whole council admired his extraordinary humility.
British Dictionary definitions for admired

admire

/ədˈmaɪə/
verb (transitive)
1.
to regard with esteem, respect, approval, or pleased surprise
2.
(archaic) to wonder at
Derived Forms
admirer, noun
admiring, adjective
admiringly, adverb
Word Origin
C16: from Latin admīrāri to wonder at, from ad- to, at + mīrāri to wonder, from mīrus wonderful
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for admired

admire

v.

early 15c. (implied in admired), from Middle French admirer (Old French amirer, 14c.), or directly from Latin admirari "to wonder at" (see admiration). Related: Admiring; admiringly.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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11
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