admiring

[ad-mahyuhr-ing]
adjective
displaying or feeling admiration: admiring looks.

Origin:
1620–30; admire + -ing2

admiringly, adverb
half-admiring, adjective
half-admiringly, adverb
self-admiring, adjective
unadmiring, adjective
unadmiringly, adverb
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World English Dictionary
admire (ədˈmaɪə)
 
vb
1.  to regard with esteem, respect, approval, or pleased surprise
2.  archaic to wonder at
 
[C16: from Latin admīrāri to wonder at, from ad- to, at + mīrāri to wonder, from mīrus wonderful]
 
ad'mirer
 
n
 
ad'miring
 
adj
 
ad'miringly
 
adv

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

admire
late 16c., from Fr. admirer (O.Fr. amirer, 14c.), from L. admirari (see admiration). Noun admirer is recorded from c.1600; "In common speech, a lover" [Johnson], a sense recorded from c.1705.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Example sentences
The clerk showed him the gun, and he handled the pistol grip admiringly.
They looked at the kitchen for a minute, and when she spoke he nodded
  admiringly, but he said nothing.
She winds up as a devoted servant to the handsome musician she has gazed at
  admiringly since her girlhood.
Smitten, she proceeds to humor her boss, who admiringly takes her for a wealthy
  debutante.
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