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ado

[uh-doo] /əˈdu/
noun
1.
busy activity; bustle; fuss.
Origin
1250-1300
1250-1300; Middle English (north) at do, a phrase equivalent to at to (< Old Norse, which used at with the infinitive) + do do1
Can be confused
à deux, adieu, ado (see synonym study at the current entry)
Synonyms
flurry; confusion, upset, excitement; hubbub, noise, turmoil. Ado, to-do, commotion, stir, tumult suggest a great deal of fuss and noise. Ado implies a confused bustle of activity, a considerable emotional upset, and a great deal of talking: Much Ado About Nothing. To-do, now more commonly used, may mean merely excitement and noise and may be pleasant or unpleasant: a great to-do over a movie star. Commotion suggests a noisy confusion and babble: commotion at the scene of an accident. Stir suggests excitement and noise, with a hint of emotional cause: The report was followed by a tremendous stir in the city. Tumult suggests disorder with noise and violence: a tumult as the mob stormed the Bastille.
Antonyms
calm, peace, tranquillity.
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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Examples for ado
  • All which leads us to conclude that this uproar has been little more than much ado about nothing.
  • But the government may lock him up without further ado.
  • In other words, from the get-go this was much ado about nothing.
  • If a really obvious short list emerges, e-mail everyone and ask if they want to approve it without further ado.
  • It is much ado about nothing-or practically nothing, we'd say.
  • It's enough to convict, or to arrange a plea bargain without further ado.
  • There ya go much ado about nothing as the bard wud tell.
British Dictionary definitions for ado

ado

/əˈduː/
noun
1.
bustling activity; fuss; bother; delay (esp in the phrases without more ado, with much ado)
Word Origin
C14: from the phrase at do a to-do, from Old Norse at to (marking the infinitive) + do1

ADO

abbreviation
1.
accumulated day off
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for ado
n.

late 14c., "conflict, fighting; difficulty, trouble," compounded from at do, dialectal in Norse influenced areas of England for to do, as some Scandinavian languages used at with infinitive of a verb where Modern English uses to. For sense development, cf. to-do. Meaning "fuss" is from early 15c. Also used in Middle English for "dealings, traffic," and "sexual intercourse" (both c.1400).

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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ado in Technology
The Free On-line Dictionary of Computing, © Denis Howe 2010 http://foldoc.org
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4
4
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