ado

[uh-doo]
noun
busy activity; bustle; fuss.

Origin:
1250–1300; Middle English (north) at do, a phrase equivalent to at to (< Old Norse, which used at with the infinitive) + do do1

à deux, adieu, ado (see synonym study at the current entry).


flurry; confusion, upset, excitement; hubbub, noise, turmoil. Ado, to-do, commotion, stir, tumult suggest a great deal of fuss and noise. Ado implies a confused bustle of activity, a considerable emotional upset, and a great deal of talking: Much Ado About Nothing. To-do now more commonly used, may mean merely excitement and noise and may be pleasant or unpleasant: a great to-do over a movie star. Commotion suggests a noisy confusion and babble: commotion at the scene of an accident. Stir suggests excitement and noise, with a hint of emotional cause: The report was followed by a tremendous stir in the city. Tumult suggests disorder with noise and violence: a tumult as the mob stormed the Bastille.


calm, peace, tranquillity.
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
Cite This Source Link To ado
Collins
World English Dictionary
ado (əˈduː)
 
n
bustling activity; fuss; bother; delay (esp in the phrases without more ado, with much ado)
 
[C14: from the phrase at do a to-do, from Old Norse at to (marking the infinitive) + do1]

ADO
 
abbreviation for
accumulated day off

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009
Cite This Source
Etymonline
Word Origin & History

ado
late 13c., compounded from at do, dialectal in Norse influenced areas of England for to do, as some Scandinavian languages used at with infinitive of a verb where Modern English uses to. For sense development, cf. to-do.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
Cite This Source
FOLDOC
Computing Dictionary

ADO definition


ActiveX Data Objects

The Free On-line Dictionary of Computing, © Denis Howe 2010 http://foldoc.org
Cite This Source
Example sentences
All which leads us to conclude that this uproar has been little more than much
  ado about nothing.
But the government may lock him up without further ado.
In other words, from the get-go this was much ado about nothing.
If a really obvious short list emerges, e-mail everyone and ask if they want to
  approve it without further ado.
Related Questions
Copyright © 2014 Dictionary.com, LLC. All rights reserved.
  • Please Login or Sign Up to use the Recent Searches feature
FAVORITES
RECENT

;