aerobe

aerobe

[air-ohb]
noun
an organism, especially a bacterium, that requires air or free oxygen for life (opposed to anaerobe ).

Origin:
1875–80; aer- + (micr)obe

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Collins
World English Dictionary
aerobe or aerobium (ˈɛərəʊb, ɛəˈrəʊbɪəm)
 
n , pl -obes, -obia
Compare anaerobe an organism that requires oxygen for respiration
 
[C19: from aero- + Greek bios life. Compare microbe]
 
aerobium or aerobium (ˈɛərəʊb, ɛəˈrəʊbɪəm, -ˈəʊbɪə)
 
n
 
[C19: from aero- + Greek bios life. Compare microbe]

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
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American Heritage
Medical Dictionary

aerobe aer·obe (âr'ōb')
n.
An organism, such as a bacterium, requiring oxygen to live.

The American Heritage® Stedman's Medical Dictionary
Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company.
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American Heritage
Science Dictionary
aerobe   (âr'ōb')  Pronunciation Key 
An organism, such as a bacterium, that can or must live in the presence of oxygen. Compare anaerobe.
The American Heritage® Science Dictionary
Copyright © 2002. Published by Houghton Mifflin. All rights reserved.
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Encyclopedia Britannica
Encyclopedia

aerobe

an organism able to live and reproduce only in the presence of free oxygen (e.g., certain bacteria and certain yeasts). Organisms that grow in the absence of free oxygen are termed anaerobes; those that grow only in the absence of oxygen are obligate, or strict, anaerobes. Some species, called facultative anaerobes, are able to grow either with or without free oxygen. Certain others, able to grow best in the presence of low amounts of oxygen, are called microaerophiles.

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Encyclopedia Britannica, 2008. Encyclopedia Britannica Online.
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