affectionate

[uh-fek-shuh-nit]
adjective
1.
showing, indicating, or characterized by affection or love; fondly tender: an affectionate embrace.
2.
having great affection or love; warmly attached; loving: your affectionate brother.
3.
Obsolete.
a.
strongly disposed or inclined.
b.
passionate; headstrong.
c.
biased; partisan.

Origin:
1485–95; affection1 + -ate1, on the model of passionate

affectionately, adverb
affectionateness, noun
pseudoaffectionate, adjective
pseudoaffectionately, adverb
quasi-affectionate, adjective
quasi-affectionately, adverb
unaffectionate, adjective
unaffectionately, adverb


1. loving, fond.
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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World English Dictionary
affectionate (əˈfɛkʃənɪt)
 
adj
having or displaying tender feelings, affection, or warmth: an affectionate mother; an affectionate letter
 
af'fectionately
 
adv

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

affectionate
1580s, "fond, loving," from affection (q.v.); early, now mostly obs., senses included "inclined" (1530s), "prejudiced" (1530s), "passionate" (1540s), "earnest" (c.1600). Other forms also used in the main modern sense of the word included affectious (1580s), affectuous (mid-15c.).
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Example sentences
Mr Scruton is an accomplished stylist and his vignettes of rural life are
  sparklingly written, affectionate without being cloying.
Most of the time they are placid, lovable, gentle and affectionate creatures.
They were narrated with an affectionate touch of humor.
They were affectionate, responding to any atttention in the most endearing way.
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