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[uh-foo t] /əˈfʊt/
adverb, adjective
on foot; walking:
I came afoot.
astir; in progress:
There is mischief afoot.
Origin of afoot
1175-1225; Middle English a fote, on fote. See a-1, foot Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2015.
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Examples from the Web for afoot
Contemporary Examples
Historical Examples
  • That put me afoot, and climbing up and down them hills I lost my bearings and didn't know where I was at for a day or two.

    The Happy Family Bertha Muzzy Bower
  • When a man is afoot at cock-crow much may be done in the day.

    The White Company Arthur Conan Doyle
  • The giants had now become so interested in whatever plan they had afoot, that they paid little attention to the ship.

  • A great scheme is afoot, dearest, and you shall hear all about it presently.

    The Eternal City Hall Caine
  • The old race-course was surrounded by thousands upon thousands of people in carriages, on horseback, and afoot.

    Little Nobody Mrs. Alex. McVeigh Miller
British Dictionary definitions for afoot


adjective, adverb (postpositive)
in circulation or operation; astir: mischief was afoot
on or by foot
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for afoot

c.1200, afote, from a- "on" (see a- (1)) + foot (n.). Figurative sense of "in active operation" is from 1601 ("Julius Caesar").

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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