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Denotation vs. Connotation

afoot

[uh-foo t] /əˈfʊt/
adverb, adjective
1.
on foot; walking:
I came afoot.
2.
astir; in progress:
There is mischief afoot.
Origin of afoot
1175-1225
1175-1225; Middle English a fote, on fote. See a-1, foot
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2015.
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Examples from the Web for afoot
Contemporary Examples
Historical Examples
  • That put me afoot, and climbing up and down them hills I lost my bearings and didn't know where I was at for a day or two.

    The Happy Family Bertha Muzzy Bower
  • When a man is afoot at cock-crow much may be done in the day.

    The White Company Arthur Conan Doyle
  • The giants had now become so interested in whatever plan they had afoot, that they paid little attention to the ship.

  • A great scheme is afoot, dearest, and you shall hear all about it presently.

    The Eternal City Hall Caine
  • The old race-course was surrounded by thousands upon thousands of people in carriages, on horseback, and afoot.

    Little Nobody Mrs. Alex. McVeigh Miller
British Dictionary definitions for afoot

afoot

/əˈfʊt/
adjective, adverb (postpositive)
1.
in circulation or operation; astir: mischief was afoot
2.
on or by foot
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for afoot
adj.

c.1200, afote, from a- "on" (see a- (1)) + foot (n.). Figurative sense of "in active operation" is from 1601 ("Julius Caesar").

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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