agility

[uh-jil-i-tee]
noun
1.
the power of moving quickly and easily; nimbleness: exercises demanding agility.
2.
the ability to think and draw conclusions quickly; intellectual acuity.

Origin:
1375–1425; late Middle English agilite < Middle French < Latin agilitās. See agile, -ity

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World English Dictionary
agile (ˈædʒaɪl)
 
adj
1.  quick in movement; nimble
2.  mentally quick or acute
 
[C15: from Latin agilis, from agere to do, act]
 
'agilely
 
adv
 
agility
 
n

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

agility
early 15c., from M.Fr. agilité (14c.), from L. agilitatem (nom. agilitas) "mobility, nimbleness, quickness," from agilis, from agere "to move" (see act).
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Example sentences
As some adults get older, they may no longer have the physical strength or
  agility to engage in their chosen pleasures of life.
During the test, cosmonauts would exercise mental agility with memory games
  using a wall chart with coloured squares.
Therefore you have great mental agility and discernment to aid you as you
  access the incredible wealth of information on the web.
Second, the ideal environment for cultivating the unknown is to nurture the
  supreme agility and nimbleness of networks.
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