allotrope

allotrope

[al-uh-trohp]
noun Chemistry.
one of two or more existing forms of an element: Graphite and diamond are allotropes of carbon.

Origin:
1885–90; allo- + -trope

Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
Cite This Source Link To allotrope
Collins
World English Dictionary
allotrope (ˈæləˌtrəʊp)
 
n
any of two or more physical forms in which an element can exist: diamond and graphite are allotropes of carbon

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009
Cite This Source
Etymonline
Word Origin & History

allotrope
from allotropy "variation of physical properties without change of substance," from allo-, comb. form of Gk. allos "other, different" + tropos "manner" (see trope).
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
Cite This Source
American Heritage
Medical Dictionary

allotrope al·lo·trope (āl'ə-trōp')
n.
A structurally differentiated form of an element that exhibits allotropism.

The American Heritage® Stedman's Medical Dictionary
Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company.
Cite This Source
American Heritage
Science Dictionary
allotrope   (āl'ə-trōp')  Pronunciation Key 
Any of several crystalline forms of a chemical element. Charcoal, graphite, and diamond are all allotropes of carbon.
The American Heritage® Science Dictionary
Copyright © 2002. Published by Houghton Mifflin. All rights reserved.
Cite This Source
Copyright © 2014 Dictionary.com, LLC. All rights reserved.
  • Please Login or Sign Up to use the Recent Searches feature