amateur

[am-uh-choor, -cher, -ter, am-uh-tur]
noun
1.
a person who engages in a study, sport, or other activity for pleasure rather than for financial benefit or professional reasons. Compare professional.
2.
an athlete who has never competed for payment or for a monetary prize.
3.
a person inexperienced or unskilled in a particular activity: Hunting lions is not for amateurs.
4.
a person who admires something; devotee; fan: an amateur of the cinema.
adjective
5.
characteristic of or engaged in by an amateur; nonprofessional: an amateur painter; amateur tennis.

Origin:
1775–85; < French, Middle French < Latin amātor lover, equivalent to amā- (stem of amāre to love) + -tor -tor, replaced by French -teur (< Latin -tōr-, oblique stem of -tor); see -eur

proamateur, adjective

amateur, armature.


2. nonprofessional. 3. dilettante, tyro, novice.
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Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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World English Dictionary
amateur (ˈæmətə, -tʃə, -ˌtjʊə, ˌæməˈtɜː)
 
n
1.  a person who engages in an activity, esp a sport, as a pastime rather than professionally or for gain
2.  an athlete or sportsman
3.  a person unskilled in or having only a superficial knowledge of a subject or activity
4.  a person who is fond of or admires something
5.  (modifier) consisting of or for amateurs: an amateur event
 
adj
6.  amateurish; not professional or expert: an amateur approach
 
[C18: from French, from Latin amātor lover, from amāre to love]
 
'amateurism
 
n

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

amateur
1784, "one who has a taste for (something)," from Fr. amateur "lover of," from O.Fr., from L. amatorem (nom. amator) "lover," from amatus, pp. of amare "to love" (see Amy). Meaning "dabbler" (as opposed to professional) is from 1786.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Example sentences
Both, in the main, may be described as efforts made by amateurs to bring the
  theatre into their own halls or parks.
Cost can be eliminated by amateurs using garden or field flowers.
Searches can be amateurishly conducted because faculty members are essentially
  amateurs at the business of hiring.
Limited by the light-gathering power of their instruments, amateurs mostly
  observed.
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