ambulance chaser

ambulance chaser

noun Disparaging.
a lawyer who seeks accident victims as clients and encourages them to sue for damages.

Origin:
1895–1900, Americanism

ambulance chasing, noun

ambulance chaser, mouthpiece, pettifogger, shyster.
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
Cite This Source Link To ambulance chaser
Collins
World English Dictionary
ambulance chaser
 
n
slang (US) a lawyer who seeks to encourage and profit from the lawsuits of accident victims
 
ambulance chasing
 
n

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009
Cite This Source
Slang Dictionary

ambulance chaser definition


and chaser
  1. n.
    a lawyer or entrepreneur who hurries to the scene of an accident to try to get the business of any injured persons. : The insurance companies are cracking down on ambulance chasers. , A chaser got here before the ambulance, even.
  2. n.
    a derogatory term for any lawyer. (Also a rude term of address.) : That ambulance chaser is trying to charge me for reaching his office when I called a wrong number! , Three-hundred dollars an hour for what? You two-bit chaser!
Dictionary of American Slang and Colloquial Expressions by Richard A. Spears.Fourth Edition.
Copyright 2007. Published by McGraw-Hill Education.
Cite This Source
American Heritage
Idioms & Phrases

ambulance chaser

An attorney who seeks to profit from someone's injury or accident; also, an inferior lawyer. For example, Karen refused to join any law firm that included ambulance chasers. The practice of suing for damages on behalf of the injured person in exchange for a contingency feeusually a large percentage of the amount so wonmay be older, but this derogatory term began to be used for lawyers who actively sought out individuals injured in accidents who required an ambulance. [Slang; late 1800s]

The American Heritage® Dictionary of Idioms by Christine Ammer.
Copyright © 1997. Published by Houghton Mifflin.
Cite This Source
Copyright © 2014 Dictionary.com, LLC. All rights reserved.
  • Please Login or Sign Up to use the Recent Searches feature
FAVORITES
RECENT

;