anaconda

anaconda

[an-uh-kon-duh]
noun
1.
a South American boa, Eunectes murinus, that often grows to a length of more than 25 feet (7.6 meters).
2.
any large boa.
3.
Cards. a variety of poker in which each player is dealt seven cards, discards two, and turns up one of the remaining five before each betting round.

Origin:
1760–70; misapplication of a name orig. used for a snake of Sri Lanka; earlier anacandaia < Sinhalese henakandayā kind of snake

Dictionary.com Unabridged

Anaconda

[an-uh-kon-duh]
noun
a city in SW Montana.
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Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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Collins
World English Dictionary
anaconda (ˌænəˈkɒndə)
 
n
a very large nonvenomous arboreal and semiaquatic snake, Eunectes murinus, of tropical South America, which kills its prey by constriction: family Boidae (boas)
 
[C18: probably changed from Sinhalese henakandayā whip snake, from hena lightning + kanda stem; originally referring to a snake of Sri Lanka]

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

anaconda
1768, probably a Latinization of Sinhalese henacandaya "whip snake," lit. "lightning-stem." A name first used in Eng. to name a Ceylonese python, it erroneously was applied to a large S.Amer. boa, called in Brazil sucuriuba. The word is of uncertain origin, and no snake name like it now is found in Sinhalese
or Tamil. Another suggestion is that it represents Tamil anaikkonda "having killed an elephant."
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Encyclopedia Britannica
Encyclopedia

anaconda

city, seat (since 1977) of Anaconda-Deer Lodge county, southwestern Montana, U.S., 23 miles (37 km) northwest of Butte. Laid out in 1883 as Copperopolis by Marcus Daly, founder of Montana's copper industry, the settlement was the seat of Deer Lodge county. In 1977 the governments of Anaconda and Deer Lodge county were consolidated. The city grew rapidly after 1884, when Daly built a copper smelter on nearby Warm Springs Creek. Daly's plant became one of the world's largest nonferrous and reduction works, and its 585-foot (178-metre) smokestack dominates the landscape. The city was incorporated in 1888 and was renamed Anaconda, after Daly's mining camp in Butte, to avoid confusion with Copperopolis in Meagher county. Daly, who had hoped to make Anaconda the state capital, built one of the most ornate hotels in the nation-the Hotel Marcus Daly-there. His newspaper, the Anaconda Standard, had a plant as modern as any in New York City at the time, though it had a readership of only a few thousand.

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Encyclopedia Britannica, 2008. Encyclopedia Britannica Online.
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