anger

[ang-ger]
noun
1.
a strong feeling of displeasure and belligerence aroused by a wrong; wrath; ire.
2.
Chiefly British Dialect. pain or smart, as of a sore.
3.
Obsolete. grief; trouble.
verb (used with object)
4.
to arouse anger or wrath in.
5.
Chiefly British Dialect. to cause to smart; inflame.
verb (used without object)
6.
to become angry: He angers with little provocation.

Origin:
1150–1200; Middle English < Scandinavian; compare Old Norse angr sorrow, grief, akin to Old High German angust (German Angst fear), Latin angor anguish

angerless, adjective
unangered, adjective


1. resentment, exasperation; choler, bile, spleen. Anger, fury, indignation, rage imply deep and strong feelings aroused by injury, injustice, wrong, etc. Anger is the general term for a sudden violent displeasure: a burst of anger. Indignation implies deep and justified anger: indignation at cruelty or against corruption. Rage is vehement anger: rage at being frustrated. Fury is rage so great that it resembles insanity: the fury of an outraged lover. 4. displease, vex, irritate, exasperate, infuriate, enrage, incense, madden.
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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Collins
World English Dictionary
anger (ˈæŋɡə)
 
n
1.  a feeling of great annoyance or antagonism as the result of some real or supposed grievance; rage; wrath
 
vb
2.  (tr) to make angry; enrage
 
[C12: from Old Norse angr grief; related to Old English enge, Old High German engi narrow, Latin angere to strangle]

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

anger
c.1200, from O.N. angra "to grieve, vex;" the noun is mid-13c., from O.N. angr "distress, grief, affliction," from P.Gmc. *angus (cf. O.E. enge "narrow, painful," M.Du. enghe, Goth. aggwus "narrow"), from PIE base *angh- "stretch round, tight, painfully constricted, painful" (cf. Skt. amhu- "narrow,"
amhah "anguish;" Armenian anjuk "narrow;" Lith. ankstas "narrow;" Gk. ankhein "to squeeze," ankhone "a strangling;" L. angere "to throttle, torment;" O.Ir. cum-ang "straitness, want"). In M.E., also of physical pain.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Easton
Bible Dictionary

Anger definition


the emotion of instant displeasure on account of something evil that presents itself to our view. In itself it is an original susceptibility of our nature, just as love is, and is not necessarily sinful. It may, however, become sinful when causeless, or excessive, or protracted (Matt. 5:22; Eph. 4:26; Col. 3:8). As ascribed to God, it merely denotes his displeasure with sin and with sinners (Ps. 7:11).

Easton's 1897 Bible Dictionary
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American Heritage
Idioms & Phrases

anger

see more in sorrow than in anger.

The American Heritage® Dictionary of Idioms by Christine Ammer.
Copyright © 1997. Published by Houghton Mifflin.
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Example sentences
Women who hold back feelings of anger may end up more irate in the long run.
Anger, whether uncontrolled or bottled up, can be a dangerous emotion.
My anger over this reaches ridiculous levels.
Punishment or vengeance as a manifestation of anger.
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