animadversion

animadversion

[an-uh-mad-vur-zhuhn, -shuhn]
noun
1.
an unfavorable or censorious comment: to make animadversions on someone's conduct.
2.
the act of criticizing.

Origin:
1590–1600; < Latin animadversiōn- (stem of animadversiō) a heeding, censure, equivalent to animadvers(us) (past participle of animadvertere to heed, censure; see animadvert) + -iōn- -ion

animadversional, adjective


1. aspersion, reflection, derogation.
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Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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World English Dictionary
animadversion (ˌænɪmædˈvɜːʃən)
 
n
1.  criticism or censure
2.  a carefully considered observation

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
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Dictionary.com's 21st Century Lexicon
Main Entry:  animadversion1
Part of Speech:  n
Definition:  very harsh criticism; strong disapproval
Etymology:  Latin animadvertere 'to turn the mind to'
Main Entry:  animadversion2
Part of Speech:  n
Definition:  a highly critical comment
Etymology:  Latin animadvertere 'to turn the mind to'
Main Entry:  animadversion3
Part of Speech:  n
Definition:  turning the attention toward something
Etymology:  Latin animadvertere 'to turn the mind to'
Main Entry:  animadversion4
Part of Speech:  n
Definition:  attention, perception; conscious mental observation
Etymology:  Latin animadvertere 'to turn the mind to'
Dictionary.com's 21st Century Lexicon
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

animadversion
1590s, "criticism, blame," also sometimes in early use simply "notice, attention" (now obs.), from L. animadversionem (nom. animadversio) "perception, observation," noun of action from animadverte "to take cognizance of," lit. "to turn the mind to," from animum, accusative of animus "mind," + advertere
"to turn to" (see advertise). The sense of "to take notice of as a fault" was in L., in fact animadverto at times was a euphemism for "to punish with death."
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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