follow Dictionary.com

Is Tuesday named for a one-handed god?

annex

[v. uh-neks, an-eks; n. an-eks, -iks] /v. əˈnɛks, ˈæn ɛks; n. ˈæn ɛks, -ɪks/
verb (used with object)
1.
to attach, append, or add, especially to something larger or more important.
2.
to incorporate (territory) into the domain of a city, country, or state:
Germany annexed part of Czechoslovakia.
3.
to take or appropriate, especially without permission.
4.
to attach as an attribute, condition, or consequence.
noun, Also, especially British, annexe
5.
something annexed.
6.
a subsidiary building or an addition to a building:
The emergency room is in the annex of the main building.
7.
something added to a document; appendix; supplement:
an annex to a treaty.
Origin
1350-1400
1350-1400; (v.) Middle English < Anglo-French, Old French annexer < Medieval Latin annexāre, derivative of Latin annexus tied to, past participle of annectere (see annectent); (noun) < French annexe or noun use of v.
Related forms
annexable, adjective
nonannexable, adjective
preannex, verb (used with object)
reannex, verb (used with object)
unannexable, adjective
unannexed, adjective
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
Cite This Source
Examples from the web for annex
  • Space will be converted to a used book annex.
  • We can't just annex territories.
  • International law decrees that no nation can annex the moon for itself.
  • Peek in the annex, where the individual collections are organized .
  • The complex included a bar, a restaurant and some annex rooms for privacy.
  • They allow the city to annex land and set up free trade zones.
  • Residents on the Georgia side also aren't sure they want to annex the town.
  • These were appended to the original legislation in an annex.
  • The new annex is centered on one extraordinary display case.
  • Hot water is not a given in the annex, and the air-conditioning can be fitful.
British Dictionary definitions for annex

annex

verb (transitive) (æˈnɛks)
1.
to join or add, esp to something larger; attach
2.
to add (territory) by conquest or occupation
3.
to add or append as a condition, warranty, etc
4.
to appropriate without permission
noun (ˈænɛks)
5.
a variant spelling (esp US) of annexe
Derived Forms
annexable, adjective
Word Origin
C14: from Medieval Latin annexāre, from Latin annectere to attach to, from nectere to join

annexe

/ˈænɛks/
noun
1.
  1. an extension to a main building
  2. a building used as an addition to a main building nearby
2.
something added or annexed, esp a supplement to a document
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
Cite This Source
Contemporary definitions for annex
noun

See annexure

Dictionary.com's 21st Century Lexicon
Copyright © 2003-2014 Dictionary.com, LLC
Cite This Source
Word Origin and History for annex
v.

late 14c., "to connect with," from Old French annexer "to join" (13c.), from Medieval Latin annexare, frequentative of Latin annecetere "to bind to," from ad- "to" (see ad-) + nectere "to tie, bind" (see nexus). Almost always meaning "to join in a subordinate capacity." Of nations or territories, c.1400. Related: Annexed; annexing.

n.

1540s, "an adjunct, accessory," from French annexe, from annexer (see annex (v.)). Meaning "supplementary building" is from 1861.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
Cite This Source

Word of the Day

Difficulty index for annex

Many English speakers likely know this word

Word Value for annex

12
14
Scrabble Words With Friends

Quotes with annex