antimony

[an-tuh-moh-nee]
noun Chemistry.
a brittle, lustrous, white metallic element occurring in nature free or combined, used chiefly in alloys and in compounds in medicine. Symbol: Sb; atomic number: 51; atomic weight: 121.75.

Origin:
1375–1425; late Middle English antimonie < Medieval Latin antimōnium, perhaps < dialectal Arabic uthmud

antimonial, adjective, noun
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World English Dictionary
antimony (ˈæntɪmənɪ)
 
n
a toxic metallic element that exists in two allotropic forms and occurs principally in stibnite. The stable form is a brittle silvery-white crystalline metal that is added to alloys to increase their strength and hardness and is used in semiconductors. Symbol: Sb; atomic no: 51; atomic wt: 121.757; valency: 0, --3, +3, or +5; relative density: 6.691; melting pt: 630.76°C; boiling pt: 1587°C
 
[C15: from Medieval Latin antimōnium, of uncertain origin]

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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

antimony
brittle metallic element, late 15c., from M.L. antimonium, an alchemist's term (used 11c. by Constantinus Africanus), origin obscure, probably a Latinization of Gk. stimmi, from some Arabic word (cf. 'othmud), unless the Arabic word is from the Gk.; probably ult. from Egyptian stm "powdered antimony"
(used to paint the eyelids). In folk etymology, anti-moine "monk's bane" (from Fr. moine). As a pure element, it is attested from 1788; chemical symbol Sb is for Stibium.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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American Heritage
Medical Dictionary

antimony an·ti·mo·ny (ān'tə-mō'nē)
n.
Symbol Sb
An element having several allotropes, the most common of which is a brittle, silver-white crystalline metal. It is used in alloys and in flame-proofing compounds. Atomic number 51; atomic weight 121.76; melting point 630.6°C; boiling point 1,587°C; specific gravity 6.691; valence 3, 5.

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American Heritage
Science Dictionary
antimony   (ān'tə-mō'nē)  Pronunciation Key 
Symbol Sb
A metalloid element having many forms, the most common of which is a hard, very brittle, shiny, blue-white crystal. It is used in a wide variety of alloys, especially with lead in car batteries, and in the manufacture of flameproofing compounds. Atomic number 51; atomic weight 121.76; melting point 630.5°C (1,167°F); boiling point 1,380°C (2,516°F); specific gravity 6.691; valence 3, 5. See Periodic Table.
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Example sentences
The region is also rich in antimony, gold, zinc and tin.
Statistics and information on the worldwide supply, demand, and flow of antimony.
It is decomposed slowly by water to hydrochloric acid and antimony oxychloride.
Images for antimony
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