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antiquate

[an-ti-kweyt] /ˈæn tɪˌkweɪt/
verb (used with object), antiquated, antiquating.
1.
to make obsolete, old-fashioned, or out of date by replacing with something newer or better:
This latest device will antiquate the ice-cube tray.
2.
to design or create in an antique style; cause to appear antique.
Origin of antiquate
late Middle English
1400-1450
1400-50; late Middle English antiquat old < Medieval Latin antīquātus old, ancient, past participle of antiquāre to put in an earlier state, verbal derivative of Latin antīquus; see antique
Related forms
antiquation, noun
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2015.
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Examples from the Web for antiquate
Historical Examples
  • Whilst these were under discussion, new matter of complaint came over, which seemed to antiquate the first.

  • A little peaceful study and development of submarines and aircraft will antiquate our present antidotes.

    Another Sheaf John Galsworthy
  • Seriously, I believe it will antiquate all types of airplanes, prop or jet.

    The Black Star Passes John W Campbell
  • Such works are held as antiquate and mossy; And as regards the younger folk, indeed, They never yet have been so pert and saucy.

    Faust Johann Wolfgang Von Goethe
British Dictionary definitions for antiquate

antiquate

/ˈæntɪˌkweɪt/
verb (transitive)
1.
to make obsolete or old-fashioned
2.
to give an old or antique appearance to
Word Origin
C15: from Latin antīquāre to make old, from antīquus ancient
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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