antivenin

[an-tee-ven-in, an-tahy-]
noun
1.
an antitoxin present in the blood of an animal following repeated injections of venom.
2.
the antitoxic serum obtained from such blood.

Origin:
1890–95; earlier antiven(ene) (anti- + venene < Latin venēnum potion, poison; see venom) + -in2

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Collins
World English Dictionary
antivenin or antivenene (ˌæntɪˈvɛnɪn, ˌæntɪvɪˈniːn)
 
n
an antitoxin that counteracts a specific venom, esp snake venom
 
[C19: from anti- + ven(om) + -in]
 
antivenene or antivenene
 
n
 
[C19: from anti- + ven(om) + -in]

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
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American Heritage
Medical Dictionary

antivenin an·ti·ven·in (ān'tē-věn'ĭn, ān'tī-)
n.
An antitoxin active against venom.

The American Heritage® Stedman's Medical Dictionary
Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company.
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American Heritage
Science Dictionary
antivenin   (ān'tē-věn'ĭn, ān'tī-)  Pronunciation Key 
  1. An antitoxin active against the venom of a snake, spider, or other venomous animal or insect.

  2. An animal serum containing antivenins, used in medicine to treat poisoning caused by animal or insect venom.


The American Heritage® Science Dictionary
Copyright © 2002. Published by Houghton Mifflin. All rights reserved.
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Example sentences
Bio-Ken milks snakes for their venom and sends it to labs to develop antivenin.
There is no antivenin for a cone snail sting, and treatment is limited to merely keeping victims alive until the toxins wear off.
Also called antivenin autoimmune: adjective: having to do with the response of an organism to its own cells, tissues, and organs.
The venom is later injected into horses, which produce antivenin for the treatment of snakebites in humans.
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