apothecary

[uh-poth-uh-ker-ee]
noun, plural apothecaries.
1.
a druggist; a pharmacist.
2.
a pharmacy or drugstore.
3.
(especially in England and Ireland) a druggist licensed to prescribe medicine.

Origin:
1325–75; Middle English (< Old French) < Medieval Latin apothēcārius seller of spices and drugs, Late Latin: shopkeeper, equivalent to Latin apothēc(a) shop, storehouse (< Greek apothḗkē; see apo-, theca) + -ārius -ary

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Collins
World English Dictionary
apothecary (əˈpɒθɪkərɪ)
 
n , pl -caries
1.  an archaic word for pharmacist
2.  law a chemist licensed by the Society of Apothecaries of London to prescribe, prepare, and sell drugs
 
[C14: from Old French apotecaire, from Late Latin apothēcārius warehouseman, from apothēca, from Greek apothēkē storehouse]

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

apothecary
mid-14c., "shopkeeper," from O.Fr. apotecaire (13c.), from L.L. apothecarius "storekeeper," from L. apotheca "storehouse," from Gk. apotheke "storehouse," lit. "a place where things are put away," from apo- "away" (see apo-) + tithenai "to put," from PIE base *dhe- "to put,
to do" (see factitious). Cognate compounds produced Skt. apadha- "concealment," O.Pers. apadana- "palace." Drugs and herbs being among the chief items of non-perishable goods, the meaning narrowed 17c. to "druggist" (Apothecaries' Company of London separated from the Grocers' in 1617). Same root produced Fr. boutique and Sp. bodega. Apothecaries formerly were notorious for "the assumed gravity and affectation of knowledge generally put on by the gentlemen of this profession, who are commonly as superficial in their learning as they are pedantic in their language" [Francis Grose, "A Classical Dictionary of the Vulgar Tongue," 1796]. Hence, Apothecary's Latin, barbarously mangled, also known as Dog Latin
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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American Heritage
Medical Dictionary

apothecary a·poth·e·car·y (ə-pŏth'ĭ-kěr'ē)
n. pl. a·poth·e·car·ies
Abbr. ap.

  1. One that prepares and sells drugs and other medicines; a pharmacist.

  2. See pharmacy.

The American Heritage® Stedman's Medical Dictionary
Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company.
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Easton
Bible Dictionary

Apothecary definition


rendered in the margin and the Revised Version "perfumer," in Ex. 30:25; 37:29; Eccl. 10:1. The holy oils and ointments were prepared by priests properly qualified for this office. The feminine plural form of the Hebrew word is rendered "confectionaries" in 1 Sam. 8:13.

Easton's 1897 Bible Dictionary
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Example sentences
Singh, a sidewalk apothecary promotes medical concoctions derived from trees.
The service station had them in a big glass apothecary jar and they cost a dime.
You find yourself in a turn-of-the-last-century town with a trolley and an
  apothecary and a barber shop.
You see a carefully composed vignette that includes a bench, a lamp, an
  apothecary cabinet and framed artworks.
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