appease

[uh-peez]
verb (used with object), appeased, appeasing.
1.
to bring to a state of peace, quiet, ease, calm, or contentment; pacify; soothe: to appease an angry king.
2.
to satisfy, allay, or relieve; assuage: The fruit appeased his hunger.
3.
to yield or concede to the belligerent demands of (a nation, group, person, etc.) in a conciliatory effort, sometimes at the expense of justice or other principles.

Origin:
1300–50; Middle English apesen < Anglo-French apeser, Old French apais(i)er, equivalent to a- a-5 + paisi- peace + -er infinitive suffix

appeasable, adjective
appeasableness, noun
appeasably, adverb
appeasement, noun
appeaser, noun
appeasingly, adverb
nonappeasable, adjective
nonappeasing, adjective
unappeasable, adjective
unappeasably, adverb
unappeased, adjective
unappeasing, adjective
unappeasingly, adverb


1. calm, placate. 3. Appease, conciliate, propitiate imply trying to preserve or obtain peace. To appease is to make anxious overtures and often undue concessions to satisfy the demands of someone with a greed for power, territory, etc.: Chamberlain tried to appease Hitler at Munich. To conciliate is to win an enemy or opponent over by displaying a willingness to be just and fair: When mutual grievances are recognized, conciliation is possible. To propitiate is to admit a fault, and, by trying to make amends, to allay hostile feeling: to propitiate an offended neighbor.


1. enrage. 2. increase, arouse, sharpen. 3. defy.
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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World English Dictionary
appease (əˈpiːz)
 
vb
1.  to calm, pacify, or soothe, esp by acceding to the demands of
2.  to satisfy or quell (an appetite or thirst, etc)
 
[C16: from Old French apaisier, from pais peace, from Latin pax]
 
ap'peasable
 
adj
 
ap'peaser
 
n

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

appease
early 14c., from O.Fr. apaiser, apeser "to pacify, make peace, appease, be reconciled, placate" (12c.), from the phrase a paisier "bring to peace," from a- "to" + pais, from L. pacem (nom. pax) "peace."
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Example sentences
We've got a double-barrel blast of reviews to appease your gadget lust.
It is not clear whether the new appointments will appease the company's critics.
On this coast old stone monuments appease the spirits of dead whales.
In this eccentric tale, a grandfather changes his wish for youth in order to
  appease his grandson.
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