appropriate

[adj. uh-proh-pree-it; v. uh-proh-pree-eyt]
adjective
1.
suitable or fitting for a particular purpose, person, occasion, etc.: an appropriate example; an appropriate dress.
2.
belonging to or peculiar to a person; proper: Each played his appropriate part.
verb (used with object), appropriated, appropriating.
3.
to set apart, authorize, or legislate for some specific purpose or use: The legislature appropriated funds for the university.
4.
to take to or for oneself; take possession of.
5.
to take without permission or consent; seize; expropriate: He appropriated the trust funds for himself.
6.
to steal, especially to commit petty theft.

Origin:
1515–25; < Late Latin appropriātus made one's own (past participle of appropriāre), equivalent to Latin ap- ap-1 + propri(us) one's own + -ātus -ate1

appropriately, adverb
appropriateness, noun
appropriative [uh-proh-pree-ey-tiv, -uh-tiv] , adjective
appropriativeness, noun
appropriator, noun
nonappropriative, adjective
quasi-appropriate, adjective
quasi-appropriately, adverb
reappropriate, verb (used with object), reappropriated, reappropriating.
well-appropriated, adjective

appropriate, apropos, expropriate.


1. befitting, apt, meet, felicitous, suited, proper, due, becoming, pertinent. 3. apportion, allocate, assign.


1. unsuitable, inept.
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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World English Dictionary
appropriate
 
adj
1.  right or suitable; fitting
2.  rare particular; own: they had their appropriate methods
 
vb
3.  to take for one's own use, esp illegally or without permission
4.  to put aside (funds, etc) for a particular purpose or person
 
[C15: from Late Latin appropriāre to make one's own, from Latin proprius one's own; see proper]
 
ap'propriable
 
adj
 
ap'propriately
 
adv
 
ap'propriateness
 
n
 
ap'propriative
 
adj
 
ap'propriator
 
n

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

appropriate
1520s, from L.L. appropriatus, pp. of appropriare, adpropriare (c.450) "to make one's own," from L. ad- "to" + propriare "take as one's own," from proprius "one's own" (see proper). Adj. sense of "specially suitable, proper" is from 1540s.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Example sentences
We generally think of time as a function that is appropriately expressed in a
  purely formal manner.
In the climactic scenes, the worlds do indeed collide, with appropriately
  spectacular results.
He replied to questions in full sentences, including long words used
  appropriately.
Find an appropriately dark scene, one that will let you do several second
  exposures.
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