aqueduct

[ak-wi-duhkt]
noun
1.
Civil Engineering.
a.
a conduit or artificial channel for conducting water from a distance, usually by means of gravity.
b.
a bridgelike structure that carries a water conduit or canal across a valley or over a river.
2.
Anatomy. a canal or passage through which liquids pass.

Origin:
< Medieval Latin aquēductus < Latin aquae ductus a drawing off of water. See aqua, duct

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World English Dictionary
aqueduct (ˈækwɪˌdʌkt)
 
n
1.  a conduit used to convey water over a long distance, either by a tunnel or more usually by a bridge
2.  a structure, usually a bridge, that carries such a conduit or a canal across a valley or river
3.  a channel in an organ or part of the body, esp one that conveys a natural body fluid
 
[C16: from Latin aquaeductus, from aqua water + dūcere to convey]

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

aqueduct
1530s, from L. aquæductus "conveyance of water," from aquæ, gen. of aqua "water" (see aqua-), + ductus "a leading, conducting," pp. of ducere "to lead" (see duke).
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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American Heritage
Medical Dictionary

aqueduct aq·ue·duct (āk'wĭ-dŭkt')
n.
A channel or passage in a body part or an organ.

The American Heritage® Stedman's Medical Dictionary
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Example sentences
Equally vital were the aqueducts, striding across a sometimes incredible
  obstacle course to carry water to the cities.
If you get the chance, go from the Union canal side, which passes through a
  tunnel before it moves onto the approach aqueduct.
Canal locks, bridges and repair depots are of great interest, as are the
  aqueducts and embankments carrying the canals.
The Goths severed the aqueduct system in the early sixth century.
Images for aqueduct
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