army

[ahr-mee]
noun, plural armies.
1.
the military forces of a nation, exclusive of the navy and in some countries the air force.
2.
(in large military land forces) a unit consisting typically of two or more corps and a headquarters.
3.
a large body of persons trained and armed for war.
4.
any body of persons organized for any purpose: an army of census takers.
5.
a very large number or group of something; a great multitude; a host: the army of the unemployed.

Origin:
1350–1400; Middle English armee < Middle French < Latin armāta. Cf. Armada

proarmy, adjective
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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Collins
World English Dictionary
army (ˈɑːmɪ)
 
n , pl -mies
1.  the military land forces of a nation
2.  a military unit usually consisting of two or more corps with supporting arms and services
3.  (modifier) of, relating to, or characteristic of an army: army rations
4.  any large body of people united for some specific purpose
5.  a large number of people, animals, etc; multitude
 
[C14: from Old French armee, from Medieval Latin armāta armed forces; see armada]

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

army
late 14c., from O.Fr. armée (14c.), from M.L. armata "armed force," from L. armata, fem. of armatus, pp. of armare "to arm," lit. "act of arming," related to arma "tools, arms," from PIE *ar- "to fit together" (see arm (2)). Originally used of expeditions on sea or land;
the specific meaning "land force" first recorded 1786. The O.E. words were here (still preserved in derivatives like harrier), from PIE *kor- "people, crowd;" and fierd, with an original sense of "expedition," from faran "travel." In spite of etymology, in the Anglo-Saxon Chronicle, here generally meant "invading Vikings" and fierd was used for the local militias raised to fight them.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Easton
Bible Dictionary

Army definition


The Israelites marched out of Egypt in military order (Ex. 13:18, "harnessed;" marg., "five in a rank"). Each tribe formed a battalion, with its own banner and leader (Num. 2:2; 10:14). In war the army was divided into thousands and hundreds under their several captains (Num. 31:14), and also into families (Num. 2:34; 2 Chr. 25:5; 26:12). From the time of their entering the land of Canaan to the time of the kings, the Israelites made little progress in military affairs, although often engaged in warfare. The kings introduced the custom of maintaining a bodyguard (the Gibborim; i.e., "heroes"), and thus the nucleus of a standing army was formed. Saul had an army of 3,000 select warriors (1 Sam. 13:2; 14:52; 24:2). David also had a band of soldiers around him (1 Sam. 23:13; 25:13). To this band he afterwards added the Cherethites and the Pelethites (2 Sam. 15:18; 20:7). At first the army consisted only of infantry (1 Sam. 4:10; 15:4), as the use of horses was prohibited (Deut. 17:16); but chariots and horses were afterwards added (2 Sam. 8:4; 1 Kings 10:26, 28, 29; 1 Kings 9:19). In 1 Kings 9:22 there is given a list of the various gradations of rank held by those who composed the army. The equipment and maintenance of the army were at the public expense (2 Sam. 17:28, 29; 1 Kings 4:27; 10:16, 17; Judg. 20:10). At the Exodus the number of males above twenty years capable of bearing arms was 600,000 (Ex. 12:37). In David's time it mounted to the number of 1,300,000 (2 Sam. 24:9).

Easton's 1897 Bible Dictionary
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Example sentences
As the comments sections of columns now show, an army of critics stands ready
  to point out an author's mistakes and shortcomings.
Army recruiting offices were mobbed as they had not been since the first week
  of the war.
As has happened several times since the revolution, faced with pressure the
  army backed down and suggested compromises.
The police or the official army will have to do the actual work.
Images for army
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