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arose

[uh-rohz] /əˈroʊz/
verb
1.
simple past tense of arise.
Can be confused
arose, arouse.

arise

[uh-rahyz] /əˈraɪz/
verb (used without object), arose, arisen
[uh-riz-uh n] /əˈrɪz ən/ (Show IPA),
arising.
1.
to get up from sitting, lying, or kneeling; rise:
He arose from his chair when she entered the room.
2.
to awaken; wake up:
He arose at sunrise to get an early start to the beach.
3.
to move upward; mount; ascend:
A thin curl of smoke arose lazily from the cabin.
4.
to come into being, action, or notice; originate; appear; spring up:
New problems arise daily.
5.
to result or proceed; spring or issue (sometimes followed by from):
It is difficult to foresee the consequences that may arise from this action. After such destruction many problems in resettlement often arise.
Origin
900
before 900; Middle English arisen, Old English ārīsan; cognate with Gothic ur-reisan. See a-3, rise
Related forms
rearise, verb (used without object), rearose, rearisen, rearising.
Synonyms
3. climb. 4. emerge, flow, emanate.
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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Examples for arose
  • Problems arose between oscillator coils and the transistors themselves.
  • And problems that arose last month suggest that not everything will go the president's way.
  • Actually, the work arose from a need, more than from a concept.
  • In previous entries of my sabbatical diary, one topic that arose was how to handle expansive periods of unstructured time.
  • The name arose from the bobbing motion of the wooden beam.
  • Our solar system arose from a large, rotating cloud of interstellar debris called the solar nebula.
  • Many other problems of data collection also arose that were not dealt with in a precise way.
  • In their place arose a much more promising model, the specialised online retailer.
  • Those arose rather later on, but the actual recording was fine.
  • They set only the broadest of objectives and emphasised seizing unforeseen opportunities as they arose.
British Dictionary definitions for arose

arose

/əˈrəʊz/
verb
1.
the past tense of arise

arise

/əˈraɪz/
verb (intransitive) arises, arising, arose, arisen
1.
to come into being; originate
2.
(foll by from) to spring or proceed as a consequence; result guilt arising from my actions
3.
to get or stand up, as from a sitting, kneeling, or lying position
4.
to come into notice
5.
to move upwards; ascend
Word Origin
Old English ārīsan; related to Old Saxon arīsan, Old High German irrīsan; see rise
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for arose
arise
O.E. arisan (cognate with O.S. arisan, Goth. urreisan), from a- (1) "of" + rise (q.v.). Mostly replaced by rise except in ref. to circumstances.
arose
p.t. of arise (q.v.).
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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