arouse

[uh-rouz]
verb (used with object), aroused, arousing.
1.
to stir to action or strong response; excite: to arouse a crowd; to arouse suspicion.
2.
to stimulate sexually.
3.
to awaken; wake up: The footsteps aroused the dog.
verb (used without object), aroused, arousing.
4.
to awake or become aroused: At dawn the farmers began to arouse.

Origin:
1585–95; a-3 + rouse1, modeled on arise

arousability, noun
arousable, adjective
arousal [uh-rou-zuhl] , noun
arouser, noun
nonarousal, noun
overarousal, noun
rearousal, noun
rearouse, verb, rearoused, rearousing.
semiarousal, noun
subarousal, noun
unarousable, adjective
unaroused, adjective
unarousing, adjective
well-aroused, adjective

arose, arouse.


1. animate; inspirit, inspire; incite, provoke, instigate; stimulate, kindle, fire.


1. calm.
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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World English Dictionary
arouse (əˈraʊz)
 
vb
1.  (tr) to evoke or elicit (a reaction, emotion, or response); stimulate
2.  to awaken from sleep
 
a'rousal
 
n
 
a'rouser
 
n

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

arouse
1590s, "awaken," from a- (1) "on" + rouse (q.v.). Related: Arousal (1854).
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Example sentences
Ambien, surprisingly, has even been used to arouse people in a persistent
  vegetative state.
And the curiosity arouse naturally about the peculiarities of who is teaching.
Running away will only arouse the dog's instinct and make him chase you.
And, as it doesn't add, give its journalists some shelter from tireless
  complaints that the issues there arouse.
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