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Denotation vs. Connotation

astride

[uh-strahyd] /əˈstraɪd/
preposition
1.
with a leg on each side of; straddling:
She sat astride the horse.
2.
on both sides of:
Budapest lies astride the river.
3.
in a dominant position within:
Napoleon stands astride the early 19th century like a giant.
adverb, adjective
4.
in a posture of striding or straddling; with legs apart or on either side of something.
Origin of astride
1655-1665
1655-65; a-1 + stride
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2015.
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Examples from the Web for astride
Contemporary Examples
Historical Examples
  • Besides, the silent man behind was astride the better animal.

    Bob Hampton of Placer Randall Parrish
  • I got astride of the buttress, and painfully forced my way up.

    Wilfrid Cumbermede George MacDonald
  • Cliffe looked at the small figure a moment, then seized a chair and sat down in front of her, astride.

    The Marriage of William Ashe Mrs. Humphry Ward
  • From the window of my room I saw the doctor get astride his mule.

    The Strolling Saint Raphael Sabatini
  • Sandy helped the laird to the horse, and boosted him up astride.

  • Every one was afoot or astride a pony, for there was nothing on wheels, not even a barrow.

    A Wayfarer in China Elizabeth Kendall
  • Both guns quickly stopped the rush, but not before three men were astride the concrete wall.

    A Lively Bit of the Front Percy F. Westerman
  • If you had seen me get astride of a plank, would you have remained on land, Porthos?

    The Man in the Iron Mask Alexandre Dumas, Pere
British Dictionary definitions for astride

astride

/əˈstraɪd/
adjective (postpositive)
1.
with a leg on either side
2.
with the legs far apart
preposition
3.
with a leg on either side of
4.
with a part on both sides of
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for astride
adv.

1660s, from a- (1) "on" + stride (n.).

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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8
8
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