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Astyanax

/æˈstaɪəˌnæks/
noun
1.
(Greek myth) the young son of Hector and Andromache, who was hurled from the walls of Troy by the Greeks
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
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Word Origin and History for astyanax

Astyanax

son of Hector and Andromache ("Iliad"), Greek, literally "lord of the city," from asty "city" (see asteism) + anax "chief, lord, master." Also the epithet of certain gods.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Encyclopedia Article for astyanax

Astyanax

in Greek legend, prince who was the son of the Trojan prince Hector and his wife Andromache. Hector named him Scamandrius after the River Scamander, near Troy. The Trojans named him Astyanax ("Lord of the City") as the son of Troy's greatest warrior. In the sixth book of the Iliad, Homer relates that Astyanax disrupted the last meeting of his parents by crying at the sight of his father's plumed helmet. After the fall of Troy, Astyanax was hurled from the battlements of the city by either Odysseus or the Greek warrior-and son of Achilles-Neoptolemus. His death is described in the last epics of the so-called epic cycle (a collection of post-Homeric Greek poetry), The Little Iliad and The Sack of Troy. The best-known extant description of the death of Astyanax is in Euripides' tragedy Trojan Women (415 BC). In ancient art his death is often linked with the slaying of Troy's King Priam by Neoptolemus. According to medieval legend, however, he survived the war, established the kingdom of Messina in Sicily, and founded the line that led to Charlemagne.

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Encyclopedia Britannica, 2008. Encyclopedia Britannica Online.
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