athetosis

athetosis

[ath-i-toh-sis]
noun Pathology.
a condition, chiefly in children, of slow, involuntary, wormlike movements of the fingers, toes, hands, and feet, usually resulting from a brain lesion.

Origin:
1870–75; < Greek áthet(os) not placed (a- a-6 + thetós, equivalent to the- (stem of tithénai to set, put) + -tos verbid suffix) + -osis

athetosic, athetotic [ath-i-tot-ik] , adjective
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World English Dictionary
athetosis (ˌæθəˈtəʊsɪs)
 
n
pathol a condition characterized by uncontrolled rhythmic writhing movement, esp of fingers, hands, head, and tongue, caused by cerebral lesion
 
[C19: from Greek athetos not in place, from a-1 + tithenai to place]
 
'athetoid
 
adj

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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

athetosis
1871, from Gk. athetos "not fixed, without position or place" + -osis. Coined by U.S. nerve specialist William Alexander Hammond (1828-1900).
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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American Heritage
Medical Dictionary

athetosis ath·e·to·sis (āth'ĭ-tō'sĭs)
n.
A constant succession of slow, writhing, involuntary movements of flexion, extension, pronation, and supination of fingers and hands, and sometimes of toes and feet.


ath'e·toid' or ath'e·to'sic or ath'e·tot'ic (-tŏt'ĭk) adj.
The American Heritage® Stedman's Medical Dictionary
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Encyclopedia Britannica
Encyclopedia

athetosis

slow, purposeless, and involuntary movements of the hands, feet, face, tongue, and neck (as well as other muscle groups). The fingers are separately flexed and extended in an entirely irregular way. The hands as a whole are also moved, and the arms, toes, and feet may be affected. The condition is usually caused by malfunctioning of the basal ganglia of the cerebrum. The movements may or may not continue during sleep. They cannot be arrested for more than a moment by willpower and are aggravated by voluntary movements. See also cerebral palsy.

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Encyclopedia Britannica, 2008. Encyclopedia Britannica Online.
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