atone

[uh-tohn]
verb (used without object), atoned, atoning.
1.
to make amends or reparation, as for an offense or a crime, or for an offender (usually followed by for ): to atone for one's sins.
2.
to make up, as for errors or deficiencies (usually followed by for ): to atone for one's failings.
3.
Obsolete. to become reconciled; agree.
verb (used with object), atoned, atoning.
4.
to make amends for; expiate: He atoned his sins.
5.
Obsolete. to bring into unity, harmony, concord, etc.

Origin:
1545–55; back formation from atonement

atonable, atoneable, adjective
atoner, noun
atoningly, adverb
unatoned, adjective
unatoning, adjective
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Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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World English Dictionary
atone (əˈtəʊn)
 
vb (foll by for)
1.  to make amends or reparation (for a crime, sin, etc)
2.  (tr) to expiate: to atone a guilt with repentance
3.  obsolete to be in or bring into agreement
 
[C16: back formation from atonement]
 
a'tonable
 
adj
 
a'toneable
 
adj
 
a'toner
 
n

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

atone
1550s, from adv. phrase atonen (c.1300) "in accord," lit. "at one," a contraction of at and one. It retains the older pronunciation of one. The phrase perhaps is modeled on L. adunare "unite," from ad- "to, at" + unum "one."
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Example sentences
Now you see our wisdom and try to atone for your greed.
Drivers atone for exhaust with carbon offsets.
There was little doubt they were trying to atone for it tonight.
He had to wait three days to atone.
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