audacity

[aw-das-i-tee]
noun, plural audacities.
1.
boldness or daring, especially with confident or arrogant disregard for personal safety, conventional thought, or other restrictions.
2.
effrontery or insolence; shameless boldness: His questioner's audacity shocked the lecturer.
3.
Usually, audacities. audacious acts or statements.

Origin:
1400–50; late Middle English audacite < Latin audāc-, stem of audāx daring (adj.) + -ite -ity


1. nerve, spunk, grit, temerity, foolhardiness. 2. impudence, impertinence, brashness.


1, 2. discretion, prudence.
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World English Dictionary
audacious (ɔːˈdeɪʃəs)
 
adj
1.  recklessly bold or daring; fearless
2.  impudent or presumptuous
 
[C16: from Latin audāx bold, from audēre to dare]
 
au'daciously
 
adv
 
au'daciousness
 
n
 
audacity
 
n

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

audacity
mid-15c., from M.L. audacitas "boldness," from L. audacis gen. of audax "brave," but more often "bold" in a bad sense, from audere "to dare, be bold."
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Example sentences
One is a hybrid of passion and oligarchy, audacity and caution, intelligence
  and populism.
To have the audacity to make these conclusions with the paucity of data is what
  is wrong with traditional medicine.
The audacity seems symptomatic for corporations that size.
Only I have the audacity and guts to admit to it.
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