Autolycus

Autolycus

[aw-tol-i-kuhs]
noun
Classical Mythology. a thief, the son of Hermes and Chione, and the grandfather of Odysseus. He possessed the power of changing the shape of whatever he stole and of making it and himself invisible.
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Autolycus1 (ɔːˈtɒlɪkəs)
 
n
a crater in the NW quadrant of the moon about 38 km in diameter and 3000 m deep

Autolycus2 (ɔːˈtɒlɪkəs)
 
n
Greek myth a thief who stole cattle from his neighbour Sisyphus and prevented him from recognizing them by making them invisible

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
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autolycus

in Greek mythology, the maternal grandfather, through his daughter Anticleia, of the hero Odysseus. In Homer's Odyssey the god Hermes rewards Autolycus's faithful sacrifices to him by granting Autolycus skill in trickery, but later ancient authors made him the god's son. He was believed to live at the foot of Mount Parnassus and was famous as a thief and swindler. Late sources say that on one occasion Sisyphus (the son of Aeolus), during a visit to Autolycus, recognized his stolen cattle. It is said that on that occasion Sisyphus seduced Autolycus's daughter Anticleia and that hence Odysseus was really the son of Sisyphus, not of Laertes, whom Anticleia afterward married.

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Encyclopedia Britannica, 2008. Encyclopedia Britannica Online.
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