awhile

[uh-hwahyl, uh-wahyl]
adverb
for a short time or period: Stay awhile.

Origin:
before 1000; Middle English; Old English āne hwīle (dative); see a1, while


The adverb awhile is spelled as a single word: After stopping in Hadley awhile, we drove to Deerfield. As the object of a preposition, the noun phrase a while is used, especially in edited writing, but the single-word form is becoming increasingly common: We rested for a while (or awhile).
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
Cite This Source Link To awhile
Collins
World English Dictionary
awhile (əˈwaɪl)
 
adv
for a brief period

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009
Cite This Source
Etymonline
Word Origin & History

awhile
O.E. ane hwile "(for) a while," usually written as one word since 13c.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
Cite This Source
Example sentences
He let the water run awhile before carefully filling four sterilized bottles.
Awhile back, some of us were comparing our commuting distances on one of these
  fora.
Yes it will take awhile for the uprising to send someone to talk with officials.
Everyone should get a chance to live there for awhile.
Related Words
Synonyms
Copyright © 2014 Dictionary.com, LLC. All rights reserved.
  • Please Login or Sign Up to use the Recent Searches feature
FAVORITES
RECENT

;