axiomatic

[ak-see-uh-mat-ik]
adjective
1.
pertaining to or of the nature of an axiom; self-evident; obvious.
Also, axiomatical.


Origin:
1790–1800; < Greek axiōmatikós, equivalent to axiōmat- (stem of axíōma axiom) + -ikos -ic

axiomatically, adverb
nonaxiomatic, adjective
nonaxiomatical, adjective
nonaxiomatically, adverb
unaxiomatic, adjective
unaxiomatically, adverb
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World English Dictionary
axiomatic or axiomatical (ˌæksɪəˈmætɪk)
 
adj
1.  relating to or resembling an axiom; self-evident
2.  containing maxims; aphoristic
3.  Compare natural deduction (of a logical system) consisting of a set of axioms from which theorems are derived by transformation rules
 
axiomatical or axiomatical
 
adj
 
axio'matically or axiomatical
 
adv

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

axiomatic
1797, from Gk. axiomatikos, from axioma (gen. axiomatos); see axiom.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Example sentences
The chapter dealing with axiomatic theories is the best section of the book.
It was once regarded as axiomatic that globalisation would marginalise politics.
Yet it is the central thesis of modern axiomatic mathematics that abstractness
  is the price of simplicity.
The result is an axiomatic system that has little relevance to the real world.
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