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balcony

[bal-kuh-nee] /ˈbæl kə ni/
noun, plural balconies.
1.
a balustraded or railed elevated platform projecting from the wall of a building.
2.
a gallery in a theater.
Origin
1610-1620
1610-20; < Italian balcone balcony, floor-length window < Langobardic (compare Old High German balc(h)o, accusative singular balcon beam; see balk); sense extended from the beam over an aperture to the aperture itself
Related forms
balconied, adjective
unbalconied, adjective
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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Examples for balcony
  • If you live in a city, you might have a window box or a pot of tomatoes on your balcony.
  • Good news for patio and balcony gardeners and homeowners with tiny gardens.
  • If you live in a city apartment, large or small, a balcony is essential to stop you going stir-crazy.
  • The brother escaped by jumping from the balcony of the second-floor apartment, they added.
  • My roomy private office has shoji screens and a balcony.
  • He likes to take visitors onto the balcony of the town hall and challenge them to spot a scrap of paper in the plaza.
  • It was practically defeating the purpose of a balcony.
  • At about this time, sporadic fighting broke out in the balcony.
  • Sweat-stained hikers are lounging in armchairs and drinking beers on the balcony.
  • The top floor opens to a balcony shaded by a red-and-yellow awning suspended on metal brackets.
British Dictionary definitions for balcony

balcony

/ˈbælkənɪ/
noun (pl) -nies
1.
a platform projecting from the wall of a building with a balustrade or railing along its outer edge, often with access from a door or window
2.
a gallery in a theatre or auditorium, above the dress circle
3.
(US & Canadian) any circle or gallery in a theatre or auditorium including the dress circle
Derived Forms
balconied, adjective
Word Origin
C17: from Italian balcone, probably from Old High German balko beam; see balk
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for balcony
n.

1610s, from Italian balcone, from balco "scaffold," from a Germanic source (perhaps Langobardic *balko- "beam," cf. Old English balca "beam, ridge;" see balk) + Italian augmentative suffix -one. Till c.1825, regularly accented on the second syllable.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Encyclopedia Article for balcony

external extension of an upper floor of a building, enclosed up to a height of about three feet (one metre) by a solid or pierced screen, by balusters (see also balustrade), or by railings. In the medieval and Renaissance periods, balconies were supported by corbels made out of successive courses of stonework, or by large wooden or stone brackets. Since the 19th century, supports of cast iron, reinforced concrete, and other materials have become common.

Learn more about balcony with a free trial on Britannica.com
Encyclopedia Britannica, 2008. Encyclopedia Britannica Online.
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