follow Dictionary.com

Is Tuesday named for a one-handed god?

banneret1

[ban-er-it, -uh-ret] /ˈbæn ər ɪt, -əˌrɛt/
noun
1.
History/Historical. a knight who could bring a company of followers into the field under his own banner.
2.
a rank of knighthood; knight banneret.
Origin
1250-1300
1250-1300; Middle English baneret < Old French, equivalent to baner(e) banner + -et < Latin -ātus -ate1

banneret2

[ban-uh-ret] /ˌbæn əˈrɛt/
noun
1.
a small banner.
Also, bannerette.
Origin
1250-1300; Middle English banerett < Middle French banerete little banner. See banner, -ette
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
Cite This Source
British Dictionary definitions for banneret

banneret

/ˈbænərɪt; -əˌrɛt/
noun (in the Middle Ages)
1.
Also called knight banneret. a knight who was entitled to command other knights and men-at-arms under his own banner
2.
a title of knighthood conferred by the king for valour on the battlefield
Word Origin
C14: from Old French banerete a small banner

bannerette

/ˌbænəˈrɛt/
noun
1.
a small banner
Word Origin
C13: from Old French baneret, from banerebanner
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
Cite This Source
Word Origin and History for banneret
n.

c.1300, an order of knighthood, originally in reference to one who could lead his men into battle under his own banner. Later it meant one who received rank for valiant deeds done in the king's presence in battle. Also "a small banner" (c.1300).

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
Cite This Source
Encyclopedia Article for banneret

a European medieval knight privileged to display in the field a square banner (as distinct from the tapering pennon of a simple knight). The term was used in countries of French and English speech from the 13th to the 16th century. In 13th-century England any commander of a troop of 10 or more lances who was not a count or an earl was usually a banneret. Later, in both England and France, the style became a title of honour, conferred for distinguished military service. There is no connection between the style of banneret and the baronetage (hereditary dignity) established in England by King James I in 1611.

Learn more about banneret with a free trial on Britannica.com
Encyclopedia Britannica, 2008. Encyclopedia Britannica Online.
Cite This Source

Word of the Day

Difficulty index for banneret

Few English speakers likely know this word

Word Value for banneret

10
13
Scrabble Words With Friends

Nearby words for banneret