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barouche

[buh-roosh] /bəˈruʃ/
noun
1.
a four-wheeled carriage with a high front seat outside for the driver, facing seats inside for two couples, and a calash top over the back seat.
Origin
dialectal German
1795-1805
1795-1805; < dialectal German Barutsche < Italian baroccio < Vulgar Latin *birotium, equivalent to Late Latin birot(us) two-wheeled (see bi-1, rota1) + -ium -ium
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Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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Examples from the web for barouche
  • Word was sent inside and three citizens were sent out to address the crowd from a barouche.
  • One big shell attracted his attention and he opened it, half expecting to get a pearl or a barouche.
British Dictionary definitions for barouche

barouche

/bəˈruːʃ/
noun
1.
a four-wheeled horse-drawn carriage, popular in the 19th century, having a retractable hood over the rear half, seats inside for two couples facing each other, and a driver's seat outside at the front
Word Origin
C19: from German (dialect) Barutsche, from Italian baroccio, from Vulgar Latin birotium (unattested) vehicle with two wheels, from Late Latin birotus two-wheeled, from bi-1 + rota wheel
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for barouche
n.

type of four-wheeled carriage, 1801, from dialectal German barutsche, from Italian baroccio "chariot," originally "two-wheeled car," from Latin birotus "two-wheeled," from bi- "two" + rotus "wheel," from rotare "go around" (see rotary). Frenchified in English, but the word is not French.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Encyclopedia Article for barouche

(from Czech kolesa: "wheels"), also called Caleche, or Barouche, any of various open carriages, with facing passenger seats and an elevated coachman's seat joined to the front of the shallow body, which somewhat resembled a small boat. A characteristic falling hood over the rear seat gave the name calash to any folding carriage top. Most of the vehicles had four wheels, but some had two. A type used especially in Quebec was two wheeled, with one forward-facing seat, and a driver's seat on the splashboard. Other types were almost identical to chaises and victorias.

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Encyclopedia Britannica, 2008. Encyclopedia Britannica Online.
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