batch

1 [bach]
noun
1.
a quantity or number coming at one time or taken together: a batch of prisoners.
2.
the quantity of material prepared or required for one operation: mixing a batch of concrete.
3.
the quantity of bread, cookies, dough, or the like, made at one baking.
4.
Computers.
a.
a group of jobs, data, or programs treated as a unit for computer processing.
5.
Glassmaking.
a.
a quantity of raw materials mixed in proper proportions and prepared for fusion into glass.
b.
the material so mixed.
verb (used with object)
6.
to combine, mix, or process in a batch.

Origin:
1400–50; late Middle English bache, akin to bacan to bake; compare Old English gebæc, German Gebäck batch


1. group, lot, number, bunch, gang, set, pack, flock, troop.
Dictionary.com Unabridged

batch

2 [bach]
verb (used without object), noun

Origin:
tch to clarify and normalize pronunciation

Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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Collins
World English Dictionary
batch1 (bætʃ)
 
n
1.  a group or set of usually similar objects or people, esp if sent off, handled, or arriving at the same time
2.  the bread, cakes, etc, produced at one baking
3.  the amount of a material needed for an operation
4.  Compare pan loaf Also called: batch loaf a tall loaf having a close texture and a thick crust on the top and bottom, baked as part of a batch: the sides of each loaf are greased so that they will pull apart after baking to have pale crumby sides; made esp in Scotland and Ireland
 
vb
5.  to group (items) for efficient processing
6.  to handle by batch processing
 
[C15 bache; related to Old English bacan to bake; compare Old English gebæc batch, German Gebäck]

batch or bach2 (bætʃ)
 
vb
1.  (intr) (of a man) to do his own cooking and housekeeping
2.  to live alone
 
bach or bach2
 
vb

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

batch
O.E. *bæcce "something baked," from bacan "bake." Batch is to bake as watch is to wake and match ("one of a pair") is to make. Extended 1713 to "any quantity produced at one operation."
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Slang Dictionary

batch

adj.
1. Non-interactive. Hackers use this somewhat more loosely than the traditional technical definitions justify; in particular, switches on a normally interactive program that prepare it to receive non-interactive command input are often referred to as `batch mode' switches. A `batch file' is a series of instructions written to be handed to an interactive program running in batch mode.
2. Performance of dreary tasks all at one sitting. "I finally sat down in batch mode and wrote out checks for all those bills; I guess they'll turn the electricity back on next week..."
3. `batching up': Accumulation of a number of small tasks that can be lumped together for greater efficiency. "I'm batching up those letters to send sometime" "I'm batching up bottles to take to the recycling center."
FOLDOC
Computing Dictionary

batch definition


batch processing

The Free On-line Dictionary of Computing, © Denis Howe 2010 http://foldoc.org
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Example sentences
Add the second batch of garbanzo beans to the first, toss with the paprika, and
  serve.
Crucially, it also replicated the finding with an all-new batch of neutrinos.
Batch collectors or integrated collector-storage systems heat water inside a
  large tank or box and store it there until needed.
Recycling plants often make recycled paper stronger by adding some new pulp to
  each batch.
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