bathyscaphe

bathyscaphe

[bath-uh-skeyf, -skaf]
noun Oceanography.
a navigable, submersible vessel for exploring the depths of the ocean, having a separate, overhead chamber filled with gasoline for buoyancy and iron or steel weights for ballast.
Also, bathyscaph [bath-uh-skaf] , bathyscape [bath-uh-skeyp] .


Origin:
1947; < French, equivalent to bathy- bathy- + Greek skáphos ship; coined by Auguste Piccard

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World English Dictionary
bathyscaph, bathyscaphe or bathyscape (ˈbæθɪˌskæf, ˈbæθɪˌskeɪf, -ˌskæf, ˈbæθɪˌskæp)
 
n
a submersible vessel having a flotation compartment with an observation capsule underneath, capable of reaching ocean depths of over 10 000 metres (about 5000 fathoms)
 
[C20: from bathy- + -scaph, from Greek skaphē light boat]
 
bathyscaphe, bathyscaphe or bathyscape
 
n
 
[C20: from bathy- + -scaph, from Greek skaphē light boat]
 
bathyscape, bathyscaphe or bathyscape
 
n
 
[C20: from bathy- + -scaph, from Greek skaphē light boat]

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

bathyscaphe
"diving apparatus for reaching great depths," 1947, name coined by its inventor, Swiss "scientific extremist" Prof. Auguste Piccard (18841962), from Gk. bathys "deep" + skaphe "light boat, skiff, a basin, a bowl, anything dug or scooped out," from skaptein to dig, delve" (see spade (1)).
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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American Heritage
Science Dictionary
bathyscaphe   (bāth'ĭ-skāf', -skāf')  Pronunciation Key 
A free-diving vessel used to explore the ocean at great depths. The original bathyscaphe, constructed in 1948, was made of a cylindrical metal float and a suspended steel ball that could hold two people. The float contained gasoline used to lift the vessel, and heavy iron material used for ballast. Design improvements allowed the second bathyscaphe in 1960 to descend to a record 10,912 m (35,791 ft) in the Marianas Trench in the western Pacific Ocean, almost to the deepest level ever sounded on Earth.
The American Heritage® Science Dictionary
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